Indonesia

241 million people
2,940 USD GNI (PPP)
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Partly Free
Partly Free

News & Updates

Freedom House led a delegation of civil society leaders and online activists from around the world to Bali, Indonesia for the 8th Internet Governance Forum (IGF), the UN's flagship conference for discussing global Internet policy. Following the IGF, 17 organizations and individuals signed on to a joint statement to highlight the concerns they raised throughout the Forum, and to offer recommendations to governments, internet companies, and international organizations on how to better protect internet freedoms. This statement was delivered to the Forum during the Open Mic session on the final day by Bouziane Zaid.

Issues: 
Freedom of Expression, Intergovernmental Bodies, Internet Freedom, Media Freedom
Regions: 
Asia-Pacific
written by
Billy Ford
Senior Program Associate, International Religious Freedom
written by
Cyrus Rassool
Program Associate, Internet Freedom


According to a 2012 Win-Gallup poll of some 50,000 individuals from 57 countries, 36 percent of respondents classified their religious identity as “Atheist” or “Non-Religious.” The result indicated a shift of 12 percentage points from “Religious” to the other two categories since 2005, when the poll was last conducted. However, the interests of nonbelievers are still frequently ignored in discussions of religious freedom and persecution around the world.

Freedom House is deeply concerned about the intimidation and violence aimed at journalists and human rights defenders in Papua, Indonesia, and calls on the Indonesian government to end the culture of impunity that has allowed the violence to escalate.

Issues: 
Freedom of Expression, Human Rights Defense, Media Freedom, Rule of Law
Regions: 
Asia-Pacific
Issues: 
Internet Freedom, Media Freedom
Regions: 
Asia-Pacific

Signature Reports

Special Reports

Policing Belief: The Impact of Blasphemy Laws on Human Rights

Policing Belief: The Impact of Blasphemy Laws on Human Rights examines the human rights implications of domestic blasphemy and religious insult laws using the case studies of seven countries—Algeria, Egypt, Greece, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan and Poland—where such laws exist both on paper and in practice. Without exception, blasphemy laws violate the fundamentalfreedom of expression, as they are by definition intended to protect religious institutions and religious doctrine– i.e., abstract ideas and concepts – from insult or offence. At their most benign, such laws lead to self-censorship.  In Greece and Poland, two of the more democratic countries examined in the study, charges brought against high-profile artists, curators and writers serve as a warning to others that certain topics are off limits. At their worst, in countries such as Pakistan and Malaysia, such laws lead to overt governmental censorship and individuals are both prosecuted and subject to severe criminal penalties including lengthy jail sentences.

Programs

Freedom House helps LGBTI rights groups in Southeast Asia to push back against the tide of intolerance.

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