Egypt | Page 42 | Freedom House

Egypt

82 million people
2,600 USD GNI (PPP)
Internet:
Not Free
Press:
Not Free
Not Free

News & Updates

Freedom House is deeply troubled by the recent spate of sectarian violence between Egypt’s Muslim majority and Coptic Christian minority.

The capability of repressive governments to monitor users of mobile phones and block access to internet content is far beyond levels realized by users and presents significant risks for user privacy and safety, according to a new report released today by Freedom House and the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG). This is a serious problem in countries that lack the rule of law and where civil liberties are not respected.

Egypt’s recent election is an opportunity to unite the country and strengthen democratic institutions, said Anwar El Sadat, chairman of Egypt’s Reform and Development Party, at a panel hosted by Freedom House and the John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies on June 25.

Freedom House congratulates Dr. Mohamed Morsi and the Egyptian people on his election as the first civilian President of Egypt, the result of a peacefully contested election. We hope that this will mark a watershed moment in Egypt’s transition to democracy.

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Signature Reports

Special Reports

Egypt Democracy Compass

The Egypt Democracy Compass is designed to provide a snapshot of the country’s trajectory, either toward or further away from a truly democratic system, on a monthly basis. The compass will assess progress in eight key components of  democratic transition: the constitution, elections, political participation, civilian control and security-sector reform, media freedom and freedom of expression, religious freedom, peaceful assembly and civic activism, and judicial independence and rule of law.

Policing Belief: The Impact of Blasphemy Laws on Human Rights

Policing Belief: The Impact of Blasphemy Laws on Human Rights examines the human rights implications of domestic blasphemy and religious insult laws using the case studies of seven countries—Algeria, Egypt, Greece, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan and Poland—where such laws exist both on paper and in practice. Without exception, blasphemy laws violate the fundamentalfreedom of expression, as they are by definition intended to protect religious institutions and religious doctrine– i.e., abstract ideas and concepts – from insult or offence. At their most benign, such laws lead to self-censorship.  In Greece and Poland, two of the more democratic countries examined in the study, charges brought against high-profile artists, curators and writers serve as a warning to others that certain topics are off limits. At their worst, in countries such as Pakistan and Malaysia, such laws lead to overt governmental censorship and individuals are both prosecuted and subject to severe criminal penalties including lengthy jail sentences.

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