Egypt | Page 59 | Freedom House

Egypt

82 million people
2,600 USD GNI (PPP)
Internet:
Not Free
Press:
Not Free
Not Free

News & Updates

The firing of independent editors and cancellation of several prominent talk shows is the latest evidence that Egyptian authorities have ramped up attempts to silence critics in the lead up to parliamentary elections

The cancellation by Egyptian security of an international NGO conference in Cairo, just two days before it was to take place, is a brazen example

Letter to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, September 17, 2010

Freedom House condemns the refusal of Egyptian authorities to allow Freedom House employee, Sameer Jarrah, into the country

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Signature Reports

Special Reports

Egypt Democracy Compass

The Egypt Democracy Compass is designed to provide a snapshot of the country’s trajectory, either toward or further away from a truly democratic system, on a monthly basis. The compass will assess progress in eight key components of  democratic transition: the constitution, elections, political participation, civilian control and security-sector reform, media freedom and freedom of expression, religious freedom, peaceful assembly and civic activism, and judicial independence and rule of law.

Policing Belief: The Impact of Blasphemy Laws on Human Rights

Policing Belief: The Impact of Blasphemy Laws on Human Rights examines the human rights implications of domestic blasphemy and religious insult laws using the case studies of seven countries—Algeria, Egypt, Greece, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan and Poland—where such laws exist both on paper and in practice. Without exception, blasphemy laws violate the fundamentalfreedom of expression, as they are by definition intended to protect religious institutions and religious doctrine– i.e., abstract ideas and concepts – from insult or offence. At their most benign, such laws lead to self-censorship.  In Greece and Poland, two of the more democratic countries examined in the study, charges brought against high-profile artists, curators and writers serve as a warning to others that certain topics are off limits. At their worst, in countries such as Pakistan and Malaysia, such laws lead to overt governmental censorship and individuals are both prosecuted and subject to severe criminal penalties including lengthy jail sentences.

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