Thailand

70 million people
4,440 USD GNI (PPP)
Internet:
Not Free
Press:
Not Free
Not Free

News & Updates

The decision by Thailand’s Constitutional Court to rule that Article 112 of the Criminal Code  - the ‘lese majeste law’ - is a devastating blow to freedom of expression and internet freedom in Thailand and contradicts the constitution’s mandate to protect human rights.   The Thai government has used Article 112 of the Criminal Code (Lèse Majesté) – which criminalizes defamation of the royal family – to curtail the space for diverse political opinions and freedom of expression online and offline.

Freedom House condemns the verdict on May 30 sentencing Thai webmaster, Chiranuch (Jiew) Premchaiporn to an eight-month suspended prison sentence and to pay a fine of 20,000 Thai Baht ($630) for comments posted by visitors to her online forum that were deemed “offensive” to the monarchy. She was convicted under the Computer-Related Crime Act (CCA), which holds internet service and content providers criminally liable for content they host or transmit. The verdict is yet another chilling indicator of the ever-shrinking space for free expression in Thailand.

It is time for democratic regimes to take tangible steps in addressing restrictions on internet freedom around the world.

Pages

Experts

Program Manager, Asia

Lauren Galacia manages the Asia program.  Prior to joining Freedom House, she oversaw the development and implementation of citizen engagement programs throughout Asia and Eurasia, with a focus on Thailand and Burma.

Issues: 
Regions: 

Signature Reports

Programs

Freedom House helps LGBTI rights groups in Southeast Asia to push back against the tide of intolerance.

Regions: