Contributors

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Analysts

Tehilla Shwartz Altshuler is a research fellow at the Israel Democracy Institute (IDI), where she heads projects on media reform and open government. She holds an LLB and PhD from the law faculty at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and spent a postdoctoral year at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. During 2011, Altshuler headed the research and development department of the Second Authority for Radio and Television, the Israeli media regulator. Her main academic interests are media and telecommunications regulation, and she has published and edited numerous articles, policy papers, and books on matters of media and new media policy. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ana Arana is director of Fundación MEPI, an investigative journalism project in Mexico that promotes cross-border reporting encompassing the United States and Central America. She has extensive experience as an international investigative journalist and media trainer. Arana has previously worked with the Open Society Initiative of West Africa, and as a foreign correspondent in Central America and Colombia for U.S. news outlets, reporting on Central American civil wars and Colombia’s drug wars. She is a graduate of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and San Francisco State University. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Karen Attiah is a freelance journalist and has written for the Associated Press, the Huffington Post, and other outlets. She received her master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, concentrating in human rights and international media. In 2008 Attiah was a Fulbright Scholar to Ghana, where she studied the role of citizen participation in call-in radio shows during the Ghanaian elections, and has also studied the role of social media within African media organizations. She graduated from Northwestern University with a bachelor’s degree in communication studies and African studies. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Dawood Azami is a journalist who has worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) World Service in London for 14 years. He also worked as the BBC World Service bureau chief and editor in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 2010 and 2011. Azami is a visiting lecturer at the University of Westminster, London, and specializes in international relations, conflict studies, and media and culture. He was selected as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2011, and in 2009 was the youngest person ever to win the BBC’s Global Reith Award for Outstanding Contribution. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Anna Borshchevskaya is a fellow at the European Foundation for Democracy, where she focuses on the former Soviet Union and the Middle East. Previously, she was the communications director at the American Islamic Congress and assistant director at the Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center. She holds a master’s degree in international relations from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, and has published in the Mediterranean Quarterly, Turkish Policy Quarterly, and Middle East Quarterly, and at Washingtonpost.com, CNN.com, FoxNews.com, and Forbes.com. She regularly provides translation and analysis for the Foreign Military Studies Office at Fort Leavenworth. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Andrea Briedé works as intelligence analyst at the Risk Advisory Group, a global risk management consultancy, in London, where she advises clients on political and security developments in the former Soviet Union. She holds a master’s degree in Russian and East European Studies from the University of Oxford and degrees in Russian language and neuroscience from the University of Amsterdam. She served as an Americas and Western Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Lisa Brooten is an associate professor in the Department of Radio, Television, and Digital Media at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Her research focuses on media reform and democratization, local and global social-movement media, community media, indigenous media, human rights, gender and militarization, and interpretive, critical research methods, particularly in Southeast Asia, where she has lived and conducted fieldwork for many years. Currently, she is completing a comparison of media reform efforts in Thailand, the Philippines, and Burma funded in the initial stages by a 2008 Fulbright Research Fellowship. She is also a member of the Fulbright Specialist Roster for Burma/Myanmar, Thailand, and the Philippines. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the Press.

Kamissa Camara is a program officer for West Africa at the National Endowment for Democracy. She previously worked in the Africa section at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems and specializes in governance and election administration issues. She also worked as a coordinator for the Building Resources in Democracy, Governance, and Elections (BRIDGE) program. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sarah Cook is a senior research analyst for East Asia at Freedom House. She manages the team that produces the China Media Bulletin, a biweekly news digest of press freedom developments related to China. She previously served as assistant editor on three editions of Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s annual assessment of internet and digital media freedom. She coedited the English version of Chinese attorney Gao Zhisheng’s memoir, A China More Just, and was a delegate to the UN Human Rights Commission for an organization working on religious freedom in China. She received a master’s degree in politics and a master of laws degree in public international law from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, where she was a Marshall Scholar. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Zselyke Csaky is a research analyst for Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia. She also writes reports for Freedom of the Press. Prior to joining Freedom House, she worked for the Hungarian and U.S. offices of Amnesty International. She holds master’s degrees in international relations and European studies and in human rights from Central European University. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Melanie Dominski is a program manager at the Center for Peacebuilding in Sanski Most, Bosnia and Herzegovina, a local organization focused on reconciliation work, where she is responsible for fundraising efforts as well as the monitoring and evaluation of all programs. Previously, she served as a program officer for the Global Freedom of Expression Campaign at Freedom House. She holds a master’s degree in international affairs, with a thematic concentration in human security and development and a regional concentration in Europe and Eurasia, from the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Matt J. Duffy studies journalism in the Arab world with a focus on the government regulation of both traditional and digital media. His book on the media laws of the United Arab Emirates was published in 2014. His other research has appeared in the Journal of Middle East Media, Middle East Media Educator, and the Journal of Mass Media Ethics. He teaches international communication law at Kennesaw State University and serves as a fellow with the Center for International Media Education at Georgia State University. He is also a member of the board of directors for the Arab-U.S. Association for Communication Educators. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Jennifer Dunham is the project manager for Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press at Freedom House, and writes country reports on Southern and East Africa for both publications. Previously, she was the managing editor and Africa writer at Facts On File World News Digest. She holds a bachelor’s degree in history-sociology from Columbia University and a master’s degree in international relations from New York University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Hopeton Dunn is a leading communications scholar, researcher, and policy analyst based at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Jamaica. At UWI, he is professor of communications policy and digital media, and director of the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication and the Mona ICT Policy Centre. Dunn is a former secretary general of the International Association for Media and Communication Research and currently serves on numerous other national, regional, and international boards in his field. He is a published author and an active international advocate on issues of freedom of expression, information and communication technology access, and research-driven policymaking for countries of the global south. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sarah Giaziri is the Middle East and North Africa program officer at the Rory Peck Trust. The trust supports freelance newsgatherers and their families worldwide in times of need, raises their profile, promotes their welfare and safety, and supports their right to report freely and without fear. Her areas of focus include Syria and Libya following the uprisings in both countries. She holds a degree in international relations, a master’s degree in human rights, and a postgraduate degree in law. She practiced law for five years, focusing on human rights issues arising out of extradition and international crime cases. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

T. R. Goldman is a freelance journalist in Washington, D.C., and writes for a variety of national publications. He is a former reporter and editor at Reuters and Agence France-Presse. He received a master’s degree in international public policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sylvana Habdank-Kołaczkowska is the project director of Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual report on democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia. She also writes reports on Central Europe for Freedom in the World. Previously, she was the managing editor of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a peer-reviewed quarterly. She received a master’s degree in Eastern European and Eurasian studies from Harvard University. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Summer Harlow is a PhD candidate in journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. An Inter-American Foundation Grassroots Development Fellow conducting her dissertation research on the digital evolution of activist media in El Salvador, she is a journalist with more than 10 years of experience. She has reported and blogged from the United States and Latin America, covering immigration, city government, transportation, minority affairs, and press freedom issues. Her main research inquiries are related to the links between journalism and activism, with an emphasis on Latin America, digital media, alternative media, and international communication. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Deborah Horan spent more than a decade covering the Middle East, including Iraq, Iran, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan, as a correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and the Houston Chronicle. In 2002, she was a Knight Wallace Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan, where she studied the rise of the satellite network Al-Jazeera. She joined the Tribune in 2002 and covered the American Muslim immigrant community and the Iraq war in 2003 and 2004. She is currently based in Washington, D.C., where she works as a freelance writer and consultant. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sallie Hughes is an interdisciplinary communications scholar with a specialization in Latin America, the Caribbean, and their diasporas. She is the coauthor of the book Making a Life in Multi-Ethnic Miami: Immigration and the Rise of a Global City and author of Newsrooms in Conflict: Journalism and the Democratization of Mexico. She recently joined the editorial board of the International Journal of Press/Politics and is the program track chair for mass media and popular culture for the 2014 Congress of the Latin American Studies Association. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the Department of Journalism and Media Management and the Latin American Studies Program at the University of Miami. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Michael Johnson holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and history from Rutgers University and a master’s degree in international affairs from the School of International Service at American University. Prior to working at Freedom House, he had a one-year fellowship at the U.S. Department of Commerce in the Bureau of Industry and Security. His most recent research examined China’s rise as a global power and its military modernization efforts. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Karin Deutsch Karlekar is the project director of Freedom of the Press. A specialist on media freedom trends and measurement indicators, she also developed the methodology for and edited the pilot edition of Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s annual assessment of internet and digital media freedom. She has written South Asia reports for several Freedom House publications, and has been on research and advocacy missions to Afghanistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. She previously worked as a consultant for Human Rights Watch and as an editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit. She received a PhD in Indian history from Cambridge University. She served as an Asia-Pacific and sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mark A. Keller is deputy editor at the Latin Trade Group in Miami. His work focuses on the company’s market intelligence and research arm, providing insight into business, economic, and political developments relevant to businesses operating in Latin America. Previously he worked as a research intern at Freedom House, and an editorial associate at Americas Society/Council of the Americas. He holds a master’s degree in Latin American studies from the University of Oxford, where his work focused on Brazil and the Southern Cone, and a bachelor’s degree in history from Columbia University. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Amy Killian is a master’s candidate at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Previously, she worked with the Liberty Institute of New Delhi, expanding their Empowering India initiative to improve transparency in Indian elections. She is a former Freedom House staff member and has worked on its Southeast Asia, exchanges, and advocacy programs. Prior to joining Freedom House, she was a fellow with Kiva Microfunds in Cambodia. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Haley Klausmeyer is an editor and former researcher at Freedom House. Her research focuses on state building and democracy promotion across ethnically divided regions in fragile nations. Previously, she was a country analyst for the Climate Change and African Political Stability program at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, as well as a legislative staff member in the Texas House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. She holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations from the University of Texas at Austin. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Andrew Konove received his PhD in history from Yale University in 2013, with a concentration in Latin American studies. His research focuses on politics, economics, and the development of the public sphere in Latin America. He conducted field research as a Fox Fellow at the Colegio de México in Mexico City from 2009 to 2010, and has studied in Brazil and Spain. His writing has appeared in the National Interest and the blog Avenida América. Prior to pursuing his PhD, he worked at the Federal Trade Commission in Washington, D.C., and Servicios Financieros Alternativos, a microfinance institution in Oaxaca, Mexico. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Astrid Larson is the language center administrative director for the French Institute Alliance Française. She has served as an analyst for Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and the South Pacific for Freedom House’s Freedom in the World report. She received a master’s degree in international media and culture from the New School University. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sophia Lin is a human rights lawyer specializing in business and human rights. She previously served as an Asia Research Fellow at Freedom House. She holds a JD from American University Washington College of Law and a bachelor’s degree from National Taiwan University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Katherin Machalek is institutional development officer and project manager for capacity-building projects in Russia and Ukraine for the Geneva-based Human Rights Information and Documentation Systems (HURIDOCS), helping civil society organizations in Eurasia improve their use of information and communication technologies and digital advocacy. She received a master’s degree in political science from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Eleanor Marchant is a PhD student at the Annenberg School for Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in political communications and new technology in Africa. She is also a research associate at the Center for Global Communication Studies, where she advises on African and transnational media research projects. Previously, she worked at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at Oxford University, the Media Development Investment Fund, and the Media Institute in Nairobi, and as assistant editor for Freedom of the Press. She received a master’s degree in international relations from New York University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Michael McCarthy is a research fellow at American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies. Previously, he worked from Caracas with the Carter Center’s Venezuela Election Study Missions in 2012 and 2013, and lived in Venezuela in 2008–09, carrying out field research as a Fulbright and Inter-American Foundation Fellow. He is completing his dissertation on Chavismo’s populism with the Political Science Department at Johns Hopkins University. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Gillian McCormack has 20 years of experience in media development, electoral assistance, and training, including three years working for Internews in Russia from 2004 to 2007. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, she headed CIS Projects at the European Institute for the Media in Düsseldorf, carrying out media research and journalist support projects in Russia, Ukraine, and several other Eurasian nations. She also worked on election observation missions in several countries, and was the training coordinator for the European Union’s Network for Enhanced Electoral and Democratic Support Project from 2008 to 2012. She holds a PhD in media development and an MA in Russian, and has written numerous publications in the field of media and elections. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mohammed el-Nawawy is a Knight-Crane endowed chair and associate professor in the Knight School of Communication at Queens University of Charlotte. His areas of expertise and research interests are focused on new media in the Middle East, particularly satellite channels and the internet, and their impact on the Arab public sphere. He is the author and coauthor of several books, including Egyptian Revolution 2.0: Political Blogging, Civic Engagement, and Citizen Journalism (2013). He is the founding and senior editor of the Journal of Middle East Media and serves on the editorial boards of the journals Media, War & Conflict and Global Media. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Caroline Nellemann is an international consultant specializing in digital media and democratization. Previously she has worked for Freedom House, the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, the Danish Aid Agency, and the Danish Ministry for Science, Technology, and Innovation. She holds a master’s degree in international development from Roskilde University, Denmark. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Bret Nelson is a program officer for Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press at Freedom House. He holds a master’s degree in political science from Fordham University and a master’s degree in Middle East studies from the Graduate Center, CUNY. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sarah Oates is a professor and senior scholar at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland. A major theme in her work is the way in which the traditional media and the internet can support or subvert democracy. She has published widely on this topic, including a recent book, Terrorism, Elections, and Democracy: Political Campaigns in the United States, Great Britain, and Russia, that compares election coverage in these three countries. She is also the author of Revolution Stalled: The Political Limits of the Internet in the Post-Soviet Sphere. As the founder of the Google Forum to bring together academics with Google UK, she currently serves as an expert for the European Commission’s Digital Futures project. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Folu Ogundimu is a professor in the School of Journalism and the College of Communication Arts and Sciences at Michigan State University, East Lansing. He is coeditor of Media and Democracy in Africa. He is a faculty excellence adviser for the College of Communication Arts and Sciences and core faculty at the African Studies Center and the Center for Advanced Study of International Development. He has also served as a senior research associate for Afrobarometer and the Center for Democracy and Development, Ghana; a research associate for the Globalization Research Center on Africa, UCLA; and a visiting professor at the University of Lagos, Nigeria. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Shannon O’Toole is a master’s candidate in international relations at Central European University. Previously, she worked as an editor and writer at Facts On File World News Digest, where she covered Eastern Europe, Russia, and the Balkans. She holds a bachelor’s degree in history and anthropology from the University of Missouri, Columbia. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Alessandra Pinna is a program associate for the Global Emergency Assistance Program at Freedom House. Previously, she worked as a researcher and teaching assistant at Roma Tre University. She received her PhD in political science and democracy studies from the Istituto Italiano di Scienze Umane (Florence). She participated in several research programs, both in Italy and abroad, and has published articles and book chapters on democratization and democracy promotion. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Valerie Popper is the assistant program and conferences officer for the Center for International Media Assistance at the National Endowment for Democracy in Washington, D.C. She holds a master’s degree from Seton Hall University in diplomacy and international relations. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Arch Puddington is vice president for research at Freedom House and coeditor of Freedom in the World. He has written widely on American foreign policy, race relations, organized labor, and the history of the Cold War. He is the author of Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty and Lane Kirkland: Champion of American Labor. He received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the University of Missouri, Columbia. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mehrunisa Qayyum is the founder of PITAPOLICY Consulting, which focuses on international development, research and writing, program evaluation, and survey design for the Middle East region. She worked at the U.S. Government Accountability Office for four years. Prior to that, she earned her MPP and certificate in contemporary Arab studies from Georgetown University, and a BA in Near Eastern languages and civilizations and public policy from the University of Chicago. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Laura Reed is a research analyst for Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s annual assessment of internet and digital media freedom. She holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations from Boston University and a master’s degree in human rights studies from Columbia University, where she studied the intersection of media and transitional justice processes. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Tom Rhodes is a freelance journalist and East Africa representative for the Committee to Protect Journalists. He is also the cofounder of South Sudan’s first independent newspaper, the Juba Post, and continues to support journalist training initiatives in the region. Holding a master’s degree in African studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, he has resided and worked in the East Africa region for over seven years. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Andrew Rizzardi is a program coordinator with the Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University. He previously served as a researcher with Freedom House, working extensively on press freedom issues. He holds a master’s degree in international affairs from American University’s School of International Studies. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

David Robie is a professor of journalism in the School of Communication Studies at New Zealand’s Auckland University of Technology and director of the Pacific Media Centre. He holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Technology, Sydney, and a PhD in history and politics from the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. He is founding editor of Pacific Journalism Review and convener of Pacific Media Watch, and has written several books on Pacific media, including Mekim Nius: South Pacific Media, Politics, and Education. He also publishes the media freedom blog Café Pacific. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mark Y. Rosenberg is a senior Africa analyst at Eurasia Group, focusing on the Southern Africa region. Previously, he worked as a researcher at Freedom House and assistant editor of Freedom in the World. His opinion articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Jerusalem Post, and Business Day (South Africa), and his research has been cited by publications including the Economist and the Financial Times. He received a master’s degree and a PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Tyler Roylance is a staff editor at Freedom House and is involved in a number of its publications. Previously, he worked as a senior editor for Facts On File World News Digest. He holds a master’s degree in history from New York University. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ryan Salzman is an assistant professor of political science in the College of Arts and Sciences at Northern Kentucky University. He graduated with a PhD in political science from the University of North Texas, where his studies focused on news media consumption and political behavior among Latin Americans. He continues to research how individual-level media consumption affects Latin Americans via traditional news media. Recent research projects focus on social-media use and protest behavior in Central American states. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Hyunjin Seo is assistant professor and Docking Young Faculty Scholar in the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Kansas. She has published research studies in the areas of digital media, international journalism, and strategic communication. Prior to receiving her PhD from Syracuse University, she was a foreign affairs correspondent for South Korean and international media outlets. During that time, she traveled extensively to cover major international events including six-party talks on North Korea’s nuclear program and UN and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit meetings. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Adrian Shahbaz is a research analyst for Freedom on the Net at Freedom House, where he covers the European Union and the Middle East and North Africa. Previously, he was a political affairs analyst and researcher at the United Nations, the European Parliament, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. He received a master’s degree in international relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Yvonne Shen was a founding editor of the China Media Bulletin, Freedom House’s biweekly news digest of press freedom developments related to China. Previously, she was a research fellow at the Taiwan Foundation for Democracy in Taipei, and received a master’s degree from New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Kunaal Sharma is a second-year PhD student in the Department of Political Science at Columbia University. His research interests include prejudice reduction, religious identity, and political violence. Prior to graduate school, he was the South Asia research associate at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, D.C., where he primarily researched political and security issues in Pakistan. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Kateryna Sinkevičienė is a Soros Foundation Open Society scholar, specializing in Eastern Europe. She holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration and a master’s degree in European studies from Maastricht University, focusing on European politics and international relations. She is currently pursuing a master’s degree in public policy as a scholar of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Lithuania. She is also a market researcher and analyst for Eastern European countries and Russia at Euromonitor International in Vilnius, Lithuania, and interned at Freedom House for the Nations in Transit project in 2013–14. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Michael Snyder is a research assistant for the Center for Peace Operations at International Peace Institute (IPI). Previously, he interned at Freedom House and at the UN Department of Political Affairs in New York, where he worked on electoral processes for the UN Support Mission in Libya. Snyder holds a master’s degree in law and diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University. He served as an Asia-Pacific, Middle East and North Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Janet Steele is an associate professor of journalism in the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. She received her PhD in history from Johns Hopkins University and has taught courses on the theory and practice of journalism in Southeast and South Asia as a Fulbright senior scholar and lecturer. Her book, Wars Within: The Story of Tempo, an Independent Magazine in Soeharto’s Indonesia, focuses on Tempo magazine and its relationship with the politics and culture of New Order–era Indonesia. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Juliette Storr is an associate professor of communications at Pennsylvania State University, Beaver. She is the author of the forthcoming book Journalism in a Small Place: Making Caribbean News Relevant, Comprehensive, and Independent. Her scholarship focuses on international and intercultural communication with an emphasis on postcolonial media systems of the Caribbean. Her work includes research on the development of journalism in the Caribbean, Caribbean media production, public broadcasting, African and Caribbean diasporas, Caribbean public relations, and media representations of women and minority groups in the Caribbean. A former journalist who has worked in media in the Caribbean and the United States, she teaches courses on public relations, business and professional communication, media ethics, radio production, intercultural communication, research methods, and communication theory, and has published and presented research at national, regional, and international conferences. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Nicole Stremlau is coordinator of the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford, where she is also a research fellow in the Centre of Socio-Legal Studies. She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics in development studies. Her research focuses on media policy during and in the aftermath of guerrilla struggles in the Horn of Africa. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Natalie Sykes is a JD candidate at Columbia Law School. Prior to attending Columbia, she worked as a researcher for Freedom House. She holds a master’s degree in human rights from the London School of Economics and a bachelor’s degree in international politics from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Bernard Tabaire is a media trainer and director of programs at the Kampala-based African Centre for Media Excellence, a nonprofit professional organization he cofounded in 2009 to advance journalistic and communication excellence in Uganda and the East Africa region. He is also a columnist with the Sunday Monitor, and a radio and television commentator on public and current affairs. He was until October 2008 a co-managing editor of the Daily Monitor, Uganda’s leading independent newspaper. He holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology and literature in English from Makerere University in Uganda and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was a 2006–07 visiting journalist fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University. He has taught journalism at Makerere University and consulted for various local and international organizations on journalism and communication. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Kai Thaler is a PhD student in the Department of Government at Harvard University, with a focus on comparative politics and international relations in Africa, Latin America, and the Lusophone countries. He is an affiliated researcher of the Portuguese Institute of International Relations and Security (IPRIS) and has been a consultant for Handicap International, a researcher at the Centre for Social Science Research at the University of Cape Town, and a DGARQ/FLAD Research Fellow at the Portuguese national archives. He holds a master’s degree in sociology from the University of Cape Town and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Yale University. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mai Truong is a program officer and Africa research analyst for Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s annual assessment of internet and digital media freedom. Prior to joining Freedom House, she worked on projects related to international development, food security, and women’s rights issues in sub-Saharan Africa. She received a master’s degree in international relations from Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Vanessa Tucker is vice president for analysis at Freedom House. Previously, she was the project director of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. Prior to joining Freedom House, she worked at the Harvard University Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program, at the Kennedy School’s Program on Intrastate Conflict, and with the Carter Center’s Democracy Program. She received a master’s degree in international relations from Yale University. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Jason Warner is a PhD candidate in African studies and government at Harvard University. He has worked or consulted for the UN Development Programme, the Nigerian Mission to the United Nations, and the U.S. Army. He has published on African affairs in outlets including CNN, the Council on Foreign Relations, and UN Dispatch, as well as in various academic journals. He received master’s degrees in government from Harvard University and in African studies from Yale University. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

 

Advisers

Rosental Calmon Alves holds the Knight Chair in International Journalism and the UNESCO Chair in Communication in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the founding director of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas. He began his academic career in the United States in 1996 after 27 years as a professional journalist, including seven years as a journalism professor in Brazil. He holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and was the first Brazilian to be awarded with a Nieman Fellowship to study at Harvard University. A board member of several national and international organizations, he has been a frequent speaker and trainer as well as a consultant. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Luis Manuel Botello is the senior director of special projects at the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ). He worked for 10 years as ICFJ’s Latin America program director and launched its International Journalism Network (IJNet), an online media-assistance news service. He has worked in more than 20 Latin American countries on issues related to digital media innovation, specialty reporting, press freedom, and ethics. He is a regular on-air media analyst at CNN Español, NTN24, and Al-Jazeera. He previously worked as a journalist for Televisora Nacional in Panama. He was a Fulbright Scholar at Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Mass Communication, where he received his master’s degree in mass communication. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Agnès Callamard is the director of Colombia University’s Global Freedom of Expression Project. Previously, she spent nine years as the Executive Director of ARTICLE 19, founded and led HAP International (the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership), and was chef de cabinet for the secretary general of Amnesty International (AI) and led AI’s policy work and research on women’s human rights. She has led human rights investigations in more than 30 countries, and has published broadly in the fields of human rights, women’s rights, refugee movements, and accountability. She holds a PhD in political science from the New School for Social Research in New York. She served as a Europe adviser for Freedom of the Press.

John Dinges is the Godfrey Lowell Cabot Professor of Journalism at Columbia University and a former correspondent in Latin America. He was awarded the Maria Moors Cabot gold medal in 1992. His books include The Condor Years: How Pinochet and His Allies Brought Terrorism to Three Continents; Assassination on Embassy Row (with Saul Landau); and Our Man in Panama: The Shrewd Rise and Brutal Fall of Manuel Noriega. He was an assistant editor on the Washington Post’s foreign desk; served as deputy foreign editor, managing editor, and editorial director of NPR News; and was founder/director of the Centro de Investigación e Información Periodística (CIPER) in Chile. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Ashley Esarey received his PhD in political science from Columbia University and held the An Wang Postdoctoral Fellowship at Harvard’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. He teaches East Asian studies and political science at the University of Alberta and is an associate in research at the University of Alberta’s China Institute. His publications concern propaganda and information control in China and the impact of digital communication on Chinese politics. He is coeditor of The Internet in China and coauthor of My Fight for a New Taiwan: One Woman’s Journey from Prison to Power. He is currently working on a book comparing regime change (and the lack thereof) in China, Taiwan, Libya, and Tunisia. He served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Howard W. French is an associate professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, where he has taught since 2008. He was previously a senior writer for the New York Times, where he spent most of his career as a foreign correspondent, including serving as chief of the Times’ Shanghai bureau and heading bureaus in Japan, West and Central Africa, Central America, and the Caribbean. His work for the newspaper in both Africa and China was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He is the author of A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa, which was named nonfiction book of the year by several newspapers. Disappearing Shanghai, his documentary photography of the last remnants of Shanghai’s historic neighborhoods, has been featured in numerous exhibitions and magazines, as well as a book. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Jeffrey Ghannam is an attorney and media professional who has contributed widely to the analysis and debate about the role of digital media leading up to and following the recent civil movements in the Arab world, including a two-part report for the National Endowment for Democracy’s Center for International Media Assistance. He has written separately on the subject for the Economist and the Washington Post. He received a Knight International Journalism Fellowship to Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Jordan, and Lebanon to develop programs in the region, where he has also served as a media development trainer and adviser. He spent a decade at the Detroit Free Press, where he reported on the law and served as an editor. He was on staff at the New York Times Washington bureau and contributed news and features. He served as a Middle East and North Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Peter Gross is director of the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. His scholarly specialization is in international communication, with a focus on Central and Eastern Europe. He was instrumental in establishing a new journalism program in 1992 at the University of Timisoara, Romania, and in the last 24 years served as a consultant for the International Media Fund, the Freedom Forum, the Eurasia Foundation, and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, among other organizations. He is the author of Entangled Evolutions: Media and Democratization in Eastern Europe as well as five other scholarly books and three textbooks, and is the coeditor of two books, including Media Transformations in the Post-Communist World: Eastern Europe’s Tortured Path to Change. He served as a Europe and Eurasia adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Daniel C. Hallin is a professor of communication at the University of California, San Diego. His books include The “Uncensored War”: The Media and Vietnam; We Keep America on Top of the World: Television Journalism and the Public Sphere; and, with Paolo Mancini, Comparing Media Systems: Three Models of Media and Politics and Comparing Media Systems Beyond the Western World. He has also written on media and politics in Mexico and on media and political clientelism in Latin America. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Kavita Menon is a senior program officer at the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). As CPJ Asia program coordinator from 1999 to 2003, she led research and advocacy missions to countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Indonesia. She left CPJ to take up the Pew Fellowship in international reporting at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, and then worked as a researcher and campaigner on South Asia for Amnesty International before returning to CPJ in 2008. She has written for publications including the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times, the International Herald Tribune, and Ms. magazine. She has produced radio features for NPR’s All Things Considered, Monitor Radio, WNYC, and WBAI, and previously worked as assistant producer of NPR’s On the Media. She earned a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. She served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Devra C. Moehler is an assistant professor at the Annenberg School of Communication, University of Pennsylvania. She holds a PhD in political science from the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on comparative political communication, democratization, partisan information sources, and political behavior, with a focus on Africa. She is the author of the book Distrusting Democrats: Outcomes of Participatory Constitution Making. Previously, she was an assistant professor of government at Cornell University and a fellow at the Harvard Academy of International and Area Studies. In addition, she served as a Democracy Fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where she provided technical assistance in the design of experimental and quasi-experimental impact evaluations of democracy and governance assistance programs. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Matt Mogekwu is an associate professor and chair of the Journalism Department in the Park School at Ithaca College. Previously, he had served as a faculty member and administrator at universities in South Africa, Swaziland, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria. He holds a PhD in mass communications from the Ernie Pyle School of Journalism at Indiana University, Bloomington. His research has focused on media and peace building, international communication, press freedom and sustainable development in Africa, and capacity building for media practitioners in developing countries. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Robert Orttung is assistant director of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, president of the Resource Security Institute, and a visiting scholar at the Center for Security Studies at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. He is managing editor of Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization and a coeditor of the Russian Analytical Digest and the Caucasus Analytical Digest. He received a PhD in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles. He served as a Eurasia adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Bettina Peters is director of development at the Thomson Foundation, a leader in international media support, journalism, and management training since 1962. Before joining the Thomson Foundation, she was the director of the Global Forum for Media Development (GFMD), a network of organizations involved in media assistance programs around the world. Until 2007, she worked as director of programs at the European Journalism Center (EJC), in charge of its international journalism training program. Previously, she worked for 11 years at the International Federation of Journalists headquarters in Brussels. She holds degrees in political science and journalism from the University of Hamburg, and has edited several publications on journalism, such as the GFMD’s Media Matters II and the EJC’s handbook on civic journalism. She served as a Europe adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Lawrence Pintak is the founding dean of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University (WSU). An award-winning former CBS News Middle East correspondent, he is the author of The New Arab Journalist and several other books on America’s relationship with the Muslim world and the role of the media in shaping global perceptions and government policy. Prior to WSU, he served as director of the Kamal Adham Center for Journalism Training and Research at the American University in Cairo. His work regularly appears in outlets including the New York Times, ForeignPolicy.com, and CNN.com, and he is frequently interviewed by international media. Pintak holds a PhD in Islamic studies from the University of Wales. He served as a Middle East and North Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Sue Gunawardena-Vaughn is the associate director of campaigning for the Open Society Foundations’ Human Rights Initiative. Previously, she directed programs on Southeast Asia and global human rights at Freedom House that focused on free expression, association, and assembly. She is a founding member of the Washington, D.C., International Religious Freedom Roundtable, a broad-based bipartisan coalition that advocates for the integration of human rights and religious freedom into the U.S. foreign policy agenda. She serves as a human rights expert on the Science and Human Rights Coalition steering committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Gunawardena-Vaughn holds a PhD in government from the University of Texas at Austin, with a focus on ethno-religious nationalism and identity politics in Asia. She served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Tudor Vlad is associate director of the James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research at the University of Georgia. He holds a PhD from the Babes-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Bucharest. He has been a consultant for the New York Times and the Russian Journalists’ Union, and a Gallup World Poll senior research adviser. He has done research and written on media systems in emerging democracies, assessment of press freedom indicators, evaluation of international media assistance programs, and journalism and mass communication curriculums. He served as a Europe and Eurasia adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Peter VonDoepp is an associate professor of political science at the University of Vermont. His research focuses on African politics with specific attention to democratization issues. His most recent book, Judicial Politics in New Democracies: Cases from Southern Africa, examines judicial development in new Southern African democracies. His other published work appears in a variety of peer-reviewed journals and several edited volumes. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Fulbright-Hays program. He received his PhD from the University of Florida. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Meredith L. Weiss is an associate professor of political science at the University at Albany, SUNY. She is the author of Student Activism in Malaysia: Crucible, Mirror, Sideshow and Protest and Possibilities: Civil Society and Coalitions for Political Change in Malaysia, as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Most recently she was coeditor of Global Homophobia: States, Movements, and the Politics of Oppression and Between Protest & Powerlessness: Understanding Student Activism in Asia. Her research focuses on issues of collective identity and mobilization, sociopolitical development, civil society, human rights, and electoral politics in Southeast Asia. She served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.