Americas | Page 108 | Freedom House

Americas

The Americas are second only to Western Europe in levels of freedom and respect for human rights.  Nonetheless, a rise in violent crime and in populist governments with authoritarian tendencies has led to backsliding in several countries. Among other serious human rights issues, parts of the region suffer from  threats to freedom of the press, including violence against journalists, and infringements on freedoms of association and assembly. Throughout the Americas, Freedom House enables human right defenders and democracy activists to play a prominent role in counteracting these restrictions on fundamental rights, both domestically and through intergovernmental bodies.To read a summary of our work in the Americas, click here.


Asterisks in the country list below indicate a territory rather than a country.

To access the Mexico website (in Spanish), please visit: www.freedomhouse.org/mexico
Sitio de Freedom House México en español: //freedomhouse.org/mexico

 

Countries & Territories: 36
982 million people
69% free
Press:
40% free

Percent computed by population. Population source data.

News & Updates

Almost as troubling as the recent revelations about the U.S. government’s sweeping collection and analysis of the personal information of law-abiding internet and phone users are the inadequate “just trust us” response to the outrage and the administration’s lack of decisive action to regain the faith of a tense American public and wary netizens abroad.

Staff Editor

The public has been told that the Obama administration is avoiding new entanglements in the Middle East as part of its “Asia-Pacific rebalancing strategy,” better known as the Asia Pivot. This relative neglect of the Arab world at a decisive moment in its history has already exacted a terrible price, with popular calls for democratic political reform increasingly squelched by tear gas, torture, and air strikes, and warped by desperation and cynical sectarian demagoguery. A new U.S. push for democracy and human rights in China might help offset the moral and strategic damage elsewhere, but there was no evidence of such an effort in the recent meeting between the U.S. and Chinese presidents in California.

Board Member

Dennis Blair is a former U.S. director of national intelligence and a Freedom House board member. The views expressed in this post are his own.
There has been a great deal of concerned commentary in the media about American intelligence agencies gathering information on Americans. As a former director of national intelligence, I was directly involved in these issues, and can state unequivocally that the only conditions under which the national intelligence agencies gather any information about Americans—their phone calls, the records of phone calls they make (called “meta data”), their e-mails, the records of the e-mails they have written, their tweets, Facebook postings, or any other form of electronic communication—is when the court established by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) has given permission, based on a reasonable suspicion that the American is involved in terrorist activity.

Authoritarian regimes around the world are banding together to bypass international institutions and human rights norms that conflict with their abusive practices. Unlike the alliances of the Cold War era, these partnerships have few ideological underpinnings other than a shared rejection of democracy and the rule of law. But such cooperation has offered aid and solidarity to dictators under pressure, and created a marketplace through which repressive regimes can meet their technology, security, and energy needs without the headaches of transparency and accountability. And if the seven-year decline in global freedom recorded by Freedom House is any indication, authoritarianism is, sadly, a growth industry.

Pages

Experts

Senior Program Manager, Latin America and the Caribbean

Alessandra Pinna is the Senior Program Manager for the Latin America and the Caribbean programs at Freedom House.

Issues: 
Regions: 
Research Analyst, Freedom on the Net

Allie Funk serves as a Research Analyst on the Freedom on the Net team.

87 thousand people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
41 million people
Internet:
Free
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
27
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
362 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
277 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
326 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
11 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
194 million people
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
33
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
35 million people
Internet:
Free
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
15
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
17 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
47 million people
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
32
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
4.5 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
11 million people
Internet:
Not Free
Press:
Not Free
Status
Not Free
Scores Overview
6.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
79
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
71 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
10 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
15 million people
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Not Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
43
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
6.3 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
115 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
15 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
4.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
796 thousand people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
10 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
5.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
8.4 million people
Press:
Not Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
4.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
2.7 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
116 million people
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Not Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
39
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
6 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
4.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
3.6 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
6.7 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
30 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
54 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
169 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
542 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
1.3 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
314 million people
Internet:
Free
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
21
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
3.4 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
30 million people
Internet:
Not Free
Press:
Not Free
Status
Not Free
Scores Overview
5.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
63
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
Scores Overview
Scores Overview

Programs

Freedom House helps citizens defend their rights against government abuses in several countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. 

Issues: 
Regions: 

The Lifeline Embattled CSO Assistance Fund provides emergency financial assistance to civil society organizations (CSOs) under threat or attack and advocacy support responding to broader threats to civil society. 

Freedom House administers several funds which offer emergency assistance to organizations and individuals around the world who are under threat because of their human rights work.