Americas | Page 130 | Freedom House

Americas

The Americas are second only to Western Europe in levels of freedom and respect for human rights.  Nonetheless, a rise in violent crime and in populist governments with authoritarian tendencies has led to backsliding in several countries. Among other serious human rights issues, parts of the region suffer from  threats to freedom of the press, including violence against journalists, and infringements on freedoms of association and assembly. Throughout the Americas, Freedom House enables human right defenders and democracy activists to play a prominent role in counteracting these restrictions on fundamental rights, both domestically and through intergovernmental bodies.To read a summary of our work in the Americas, click here.


Asterisks in the country list below indicate a territory rather than a country.

To access the Mexico website (in Spanish), please visit: www.freedomhouse.org/mexico
Sitio de Freedom House México en español: //freedomhouse.org/mexico

 

Countries & Territories: 36
982 million people
69% free
Press:
40% free

Percent computed by population. Population source data.

News & Updates

Distinguished Fellow for Democracy Studies

During the years after World War II, a phenomenon emerged in several countries of communist Eastern Europe called “anti-Semitism without Jews.” Although the Holocaust had all but annihilated Jewish populations throughout the region, postwar communist regimes exploited lingering anti-Jewish sentiment to divert attention from their failures. Communist leaders would not, of course, refer directly to Jews when they denounced the enemies of socialism. They spoke instead of “cosmopolitan elements,” or used other stock phrases that evoked the notion of Jews as outsiders with suspect loyalties. The fact that few Jews—and no Jewish capitalists—remained in these countries was of little importance. When the leadership encountered difficulties, blaming the Jews remained a tried-and-true means of deflecting public frustrations over the lack of prosperity or freedom. Today, something similar is under way in Latin America, though Jews are not the chosen scapegoat. The pattern in this case could be described as “anti-imperialism without imperialists.”

Freedom House today released a public letter urging Peruvian president, Ollanta Humala, not to grant a presidential pardon to ex-President Alberto Fujimori, who was sentenced to 25 years in prison for crimes against humanity.

The world was outraged when a 14-year-old girl in Pakistan was shot in the head last week simply for being an ardent advocate for the right of girls to an education. Unfortunately, Malala's case is not an isolated one. In most parts of the world today, individuals and organizations working to advance social, political, and environmental justice face imminent danger as a result of their work. In the past two months alone, a 70-year-old activist in Cambodia was sentenced to 20 years in prison because he challenged the government's policy of confiscating local land for powerful corporate interests; in southern India, police used live ammunition on villagers protesting against a proposed nuclear power plant; a human rights lawyer opposing the creation of special economic development zones was shot dead in Honduras; and in the United Arab Emirates, an outspoken critic of inhumane treatment of political prisoners was assaulted in the street twice and faced government surveillance.

One-third of the candidates for the November 2012 UN Human Rights Council elections are unqualified for the job, according to a new Freedom House policy paper. These countries fail to meet the UN's criteria that council members must “uphold the highest standards in the promotion and protection of human rights.”

Pages

Experts

Senior Program Manager, Latin America and the Caribbean

Alessandra Pinna is the Senior Program Manager for the Latin America and the Caribbean programs at Freedom House.

Issues: 
Regions: 
87 thousand people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
41 million people
Internet:
Free
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
27
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
362 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
277 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
326 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
11 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
194 million people
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
33
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
35 million people
Internet:
Free
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
15
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
17 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
47 million people
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
32
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
4.5 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
11 million people
Internet:
Not Free
Press:
Not Free
Status
Not Free
Scores Overview
6.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
79
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
71 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
10 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
15 million people
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Not Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
43
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
6.3 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
115 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
15 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
4.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
796 thousand people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
10 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
5.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
8.4 million people
Press:
Not Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
4.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
2.7 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
116 million people
Internet:
Partly Free
Press:
Not Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
39
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
6 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
4.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
3.6 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
6.7 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Partly Free
Scores Overview
3.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
30 million people
Press:
Partly Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
54 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
169 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
542 thousand people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
1.3 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
2.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
314 million people
Internet:
Free
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
21
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
3.4 million people
Press:
Free
Status
Free
Scores Overview
1.0 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
30 million people
Internet:
Not Free
Press:
Not Free
Status
Not Free
Scores Overview
5.5 / 7 (least free)
Freedom Rating
63
(0 = Best, 100 = Worst) / 100 (least free)
Internet Freedom
Scores Overview
Scores Overview

Programs

Freedom House helps citizens defend their rights against government abuses in several countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. 

Issues: 
Regions: 

The Lifeline Embattled CSO Assistance Fund provides emergency financial assistance to civil society organizations (CSOs) under threat or attack and advocacy support responding to broader threats to civil society. 

Freedom House administers several funds which offer emergency assistance to organizations and individuals around the world who are under threat because of their human rights work.