Survey Team | Freedom House

Survey Team

Read a Country or a Territory Report

PDF versionPDF version     

Contributing Analysts

Charles Arthur is an analyst and journalist specializing in Caribbean politics and economics. He holds an M.A. in Latin American government and politics from the University of Essex, U.K. Charles is a contributing writer for the Economist Intelligence Unit, Latinamerica Press, and the IPI World Press Freedom Review and is the author of two books about Haiti. He served as the Caribbean analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Luis Botello is the director of Latin American programs at the International Center for Journalists. A native Panamanian, he has worked throughout the Americas, conducting training programs and conferences on freedom of expression and the press as well as journalism ethics. Botello previously served as morning newscast producer, host, and television reporter for Televisora Nacional in Panama, where he covered assignments in Colombia, the United States, and Europe. He holds a B.A. in journalism and an M.A. in mass communications from Louisiana State University and has also held several teaching positions. He served as a Central America analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Catherine M. Conaghan is a professor of political studies at Queen's University, Canada. She received her Ph.D. in political science from Yale University. She has written extensively on democratization in the Andean region. Her latest book is Fujimori's Peru: Deception in the Public Sphere. She served as an Andean analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Camille Eiss is a research assistant at Freedom House. She holds an M.Sc. in the history of international relations from the London School of Economics, with a focus on political Islam and dissertation research on U.S. policy toward the Mindanao conflict in the southern Philippines. She has previously worked as an editor of the Washington Quarterly at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ashley Esarey received his Ph.D. in political science at Columbia University and is assistant professor of comparative politics at Middlebury College. His academic research concerns mass media and the internet in China and their effect on democratization movements more generally. In recent years, he has conducted extensive quantitative research on Chinese print media content. He served as East Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Thomas Gold is a former assistant professor of comparative politics at Sacred Heart University and the author of The Lega Nord and Contemporary Politics in Italy. He earned his Ph.D. from the New School for Social Research and received a Fulbright Fellowship to conduct research in Italy in 1996 and 1997. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Diana Howansky is a staff associate at the Ukrainian Studies Program of Columbia University. She holds an M.A. in international affairs, with a specialization in Russian area and East European studies, from the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University, as well as an M.S. in journalism from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She has worked in the field of democratic development in various countries in the former Soviet Union. She served as a former Soviet Union analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sallie Hughes is an assistant professor in the Journalism Program and Spanish-Language Journalism Masters Program at the School of Communication, University of Miami. Her Ph.D. from Tulane University is in Latin American studies, with an emphasis on the media and politics of the region. Her book on the transformation of journalism in Mexico, Newsrooms in Conflict: Journalism and the Democratization of Mexico, was published in June 2006 by the University of Pittsburgh Press. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ana Jelenkovic is an associate at Eurasia Group, focusing on Europe, the Balkans, and the Black Sea regions. She holds an M.A. in international relations from Columbia University. She has worked on Balkan human rights and media issues at the Committee to Protect Journalists, the Harriman Institute, the Open Society Institute, and Freedom House's New York and Belgrade offices. She served as a Balkans, Eastern Europe, and Caucasus analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Karin Deutsch Karlekar is a senior researcher at Freedom House and managing editor of the Freedom of the Press survey. She has authored reports and conducted fact-finding missions on press freedom, human rights, and governance issues to a number of countries in Africa and South Asia. She holds a Ph.D. in Indian history from Cambridge University and previously worked as a consultant for Human Rights Watch. She served as a South Asia and Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Brian M. Katulis is senior fellow for national security at the Center for American Progress. At the center, his work examines U.S. national security policy in the Middle East and democratization, with a focus on Iraq. Prior to joining the center, Katulis worked on projects for the National Democratic Institute and Freedom House in Egypt, Iraq, and the Palestinian territories. He has published articles in the Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, and the Christian Science Monitor, among other publications. He received a graduate degree from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs. He served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Daniel Kimmage received his B.A. from Binghamton University and his M.A. from Cornell University. He has been the Central Asia analyst at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty since December 2003. He served as the Central Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

John Kubiniec was formerly Freedom House's regional director for Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union; he currently serves as a board member of Freedom House Europe. Since 1992, he has lived in several countries of Central and Eastern Europe, where he has worked for human rights and advocacy organizations supporting democratic development and civil society in the Balkans and the former Soviet Union. He studied economics and Slavic languages and literature and speaks Russian and Polish. He served as an Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Astrid Larson is the office manager in Freedom House's New York office. She holds a B.A. from Smith College and studied international communication at American University. She served as a Western Europe and Latin America analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Eric Loo, Ph.D., lectures at the School of Journalism and Creative Writing at the University of Wollongong, Australia. He has worked as a journalist, educator, and trainer in Asia and Australia. His current research interests include comparative media systems and "Asian" media practice and culture. He is editor of a refereed journal, Asia Pacific Media Educator. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Eleanor Marchant is a research assistant at Freedom House and the assistant editor of Freedom of the Press. She has a B.Sc. in economics and politics from the University of Bristol in England and an M.A. in international relations from New York University. Her research focuses on press freedom and democracy, particularly in the context of sub-Saharan Africa. She served as an Africa and Western Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Chris W. Ogbondah is a professor of journalism and coordinator of the mass communication program in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Northern Iowa. He holds a Ph.D. in journalism from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and is author of The Press in Nigeria: An Annotated Bibliography; Military Regimes and the Press in Nigeria, 1966 to 1993: Human Rights and National Development; and State-Press Relations in Nigeria, 1993-1998: Human Rights and Democratic Development. He served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Folu Folarin Ogundimu is a professor of journalism and senior research associate for Afrobarometer at Michigan State University. He holds a Ph.D. in mass communication from Indiana University, Bloomington, and is coeditor of Media and Democracy in Africa. Dr. Ogundimu is also the director of the Ghana Multidisciplinary Studies Program at MSU. He served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ory Okolloh received her B.A. in political science from the University of Pittsburgh and her J.D. from Harvard Law School. She is currently working as legal counsel for Enablis in Johannesburg. She served as an East Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mauro P. Porto is assistant professor in the Department of Communications at Tulane University. He holds a master's degree in political science from the University of Brasilia, Brazil, and a Ph.D. in communications from the University of California, San Diego. In 2002, he received the Best Doctoral Dissertation Award from the Brazilian Society of Interdisciplinary Communication Studies. His research and teaching interests include journalism, political advertising, and telenovelas in Brazil and Latin America. He has published on political communication in several academic journals around the world and is currently working on a book about television and politics in Brazil. He served as a South America analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Nanne Priebs von Hahn is a Ph.D. candidate in law at Hamburg University, Germany, and project manager at the Center for Media and Communication Studies at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary. Currently, she is a research associate at the Howard M. Squadron Program in Law, Media, & Society at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, New York. Her dissertation research focuses on the legal and social implications of the transformation of public service broadcasters in a multichannel media environment. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Arch Puddington is director of research at Freedom House and coeditor of Freedom in the World. He has written widely on American foreign policy, race relations, organized labor, and the history of the cold war. He is the author of Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty and Lane Kirkland: Champion of American Labor. He served as the United States analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sarah N. Repucci is a senior research coordinator at Transparency International in Berlin. She holds an M.A. in European politics from New York University. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

David Robie is associate professor in journalism in the School of Communication Studies at New Zealand's Auckland University of Technology. He holds a Ph.D. in history/politics from the University of the South Pacific, Fiji, where he was former coordinator of the Pacific Region Journalism Program. Robie has written several books on Pacific media, including Mekim Nius: South Pacific Media, Politics and Education. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mark Y. Rosenberg is a researcher at Freedom House and assistant editor of Freedom in the World. He is the author of the South Africa report for Countries at the Crossroads 2006 and served as the Southern Africa and Israel analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Hani Sabra is a human rights professional based in New York. From 2001 to 2005, he was the Middle East and North Africa researcher at the Committee to Protect Journalists. He served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Meera Shah is the Middle East program officer at the International Peace Academy in New York. She holds a B.A. in international relations from Stanford University and an M.A. in Arab studies from Georgetown University. She has spent several years working in the fields of journalism and international development in the Middle East. She served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Yves Sorokobi is an award-winning journalist and human rights professional. An analyst and commentator on Africa's democratization process, he has worked as Africa program coordinator for the Committee to Protect Journalists and as a senior communications consultant with the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative. He served as an Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Janet Steele is an associate professor of journalism at the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. She received her Ph.D. in history from Johns Hopkins University and has taught courses on the theory and practice of journalism in Southeast and South Asia as a Fulbright senior scholar and lecturer. Her book Wars Within: The Story of Tempo, an Independent Magazine in Soeharto's Indonesia focuses on Tempo magazine and its relationship to the politics and culture of new order Indonesia. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sanja Tatic is managing editor of the Countries at the Crossroads survey at Freedom House. She holds an M.A. in international relations from Columbia University and previously worked for the U.S. House of Representatives. Her research interests focus on democratic transition and consolidation in the former Yugoslavia and Soviet Union. She served as an Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Leigh Tomppert is a research and policy associate with the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission. She holds an M.A. in the social sciences from the University of Chicago. Previously, she was a researcher at Freedom House and assistant editor of Freedom House's Women's Rights in the Middle East and North Africa survey. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Elijah Zarwan is a Cairo-based consultant for Human Rights Watch, Harvard University, and the Arabic Network for Human Rights information. He previously worked full-time at Human Rights Watch, as managing editor of Cairo Magazine, as an editor at World Press Review, and as a freelance journalist in the Middle East. Elijah studied history at McGill University. He served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom of the Press.


Ratings Review Advisers

Jon B. Alterman is director of the Middle East Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. in history from Harvard University, and he has worked on the personal staff of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan and on the policy planning staff at the Department of State. He is the author of New Media, New Politics?: From Satellite Television to the Internet in the Arab World. He served as Middle East adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Robert Buckman is an associate professor of communication at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He is co-chair of the International Journalism Committee of the Society of Professional Journalists and is an associate member of the Inter American Press Association. Since 1997, he has authored Latin America, an annually revised reference book in the World Today series. He holds a Ph.D. in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin and was a Fulbright Fellow in Chile in 1991. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Festus Eribo is professor of international communication and head of African studies at East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and his M.A. from St. Petersburg State University and has worked as a journalist in Africa and Russia. Eribo has authored five books, including Press Freedom and Communication in Africa and Window on Africa: Democratization and Media Exposure. He served as an Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Marilyn Greene is an independent media consultant based in Washington, D.C. She was a 2005 Knight International Press Fellow in Cameroon, working with Francophone and Anglophone journalists to enhance journalistic professionalism in that country. She served for seven years as executive director of the World Press Freedom Committee and for several years prior as an international affairs reporter for USA Today, covering conflicts in Somalia, Kuwait, and Haiti as well as situations throughout Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. She is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University and a former fellow in Asian studies at the University of Hawaii and the East-West Center in Honolulu. She served as a global adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Tendayi S. Kumbula is an assistant professor of journalism at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California and two M.A. degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles. He has authored or coauthored four books. He has been a reporter and editor in Los Angeles and Indiana and was an editor for four years in Zimbabwe. In 1991 and 2003, he participated in the American Society of Newspaper Editors' Institute of Journalism Excellence, which sends selected journalism educators to spend six summer weeks working in a newsroom. He served as an Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Bettina Peters is director of programs at the European Journalism Center. Before joining the EJC, she worked for 10 years at the International Federation of Journalists headquarters in Brussels. She holds degrees in political science and journalism from the University of Hamburg and is the author of the chapter entitled "Ethics of Journalists" for the Council of Europe book Media and Democracy. She served as Western Europe adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Garry Rodan is director of the Asia Research Centre and professor of politics and international studies at Murdoch University, Australia. He has written on various aspects of the relationship between political regimes and capitalist development in East and Southeast Asia. This includes analysis of the political implications for authoritarian regimes of the internet and pressures for transparency from multilateral financial institutions. His latest authored book is Transparency and Authoritarian Rule in Southeast Asia: Singapore and Malaysia. He served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Byron T. Scott is professor of journalism at the University of Missouri, Columbia, and is a former newspaper and magazine journalist. His special area of interest is the media in transitional nations of the former Soviet bloc. Scott has worked as a journalist and teacher of journalism throughout the former Soviet bloc, including stints at the American University in Bulgaria, University of Tirana, and Moscow State University. He served as Eastern Europe/Former Soviet Union adviser for Freedom of the Press.

John Virtue is the director of the International Media Center of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Florida International University. Before joining FIU, he was executive editor of the daily newspaper El Mundo in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and for 17 previous years a foreign correspondent and news agency executive in Latin America, based in Sao Paulo, Caracas, and Mexico City. He holds a bachelor of journalism degree from Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Lars Willnat is an associate professor in the School of Media & Public Affairs at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Before joining GWU in 1996, he taught at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and was a MacArthur Foundation Fellow at the Indiana Center on Global Change and World Peace. His teaching and research interests include political media effects, theoretical aspects of public opinion formation, and international communication. He received his Ph.D. in mass communication from Indiana University in 1992. He served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.