Freedom of the Press 2010 - Survey Team 2010 | Freedom House

Survey Team 2010

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Contributing Analysts
 
Ben Akoh is a researcher and Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) expert on media and technology in Africa. He engages on policy analysis, recommendations and capacity building on the development and deployment of ICTs and the Internet pertaining to their role in supporting sustainable development nationally and internationally. His recent positions included working with the Open Society Initiative for West Africa (Soros Foundation) in Senegal where one of his projects involved seeking the establishment of freedom of expression and access to information legislation in West African countries. He served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Rozina Ali is a researcher at the Economist Intelligence Unit’s Business and Research Publishing desk. She received her BA from Swarthmore College and her MA in International Affaris from Columbia University, where she focused in Economic and Political Development and the Middle East. She has considerable journalism experience, having worked at organizations such as CNN, Al Jazeera English, The Daily Star in Lebanon and Salon Media. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Charles Arthur is an analyst and journalist specializing in Caribbean politics and economics. He holds an MA in Latin American government and politics from the University of Essex, United Kingdom. He is a contributing writer for the Economist Intelligence Unit, and is editor of the quarterly magazine, Making It: Industry for Development. He is the author of two books about Haiti. He served as the Caribbean analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Luis Manuel Botello is the senior director of special projects at the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), where he is responsible for developing strategies for expanding ICFJ’s work and overseas monitoring and evaluation systems. He worked for ten years as ICFJ’s Latin American program director and launched the ICFJ’s International Journalism Network (IJNet), an online media assistance news service. Botello previously served as morning newscast producer, host, and television reporter for Televisora Nacional in Panama, where he covered assignments in Colombia, the United States, and Europe. He is a board member of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin and the Latin American Journalism Center (CELAP) in Panama City, Panama. He was a Fulbright Scholar at Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Mass Communication, where he got his BA in Broadcast Journalism and M.A. in Mass Communications. He served as the Central America analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Julia Breslin is an international human rights lawyer and former research and editorial associate for the Freedom House publication Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa. Her research focus is the Middle East, and she has carried out field research in Kuwait, Bahrain, and the United Arab Emirates. She holds a law degree from Florida State University and an LLM in international human rights law from Lund University, Sweden, a program taught in conjunction with the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Sarah G. Cook is an Asia Researcher at Freedom House and is assistant editor for Freedom on the Net, an index of internet and digital media freedom. Prior to joining Freedom House, she coedited the English version of Chinese attorney Gao Zhisheng’s memoir, A China More Just. She holds an MSc in politics and an LLM in public international law from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, where she was a Marshall Scholar. She served as an East Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Jake Dizard is the managing editor of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. His area of focus is Latin America, with a specific emphasis on the Andean region. He is a 2005 graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Camille Eiss is the Policy Director for the Truman National Security Project. Camille previously worked as a senior associate for the international development organization Endeavor and as a research analyst at Freedom House and Assistant Editor of Freedom in the World. Her research focused primarily on political and human rights developments in Southeast Asia. Camille was an editor of The Washington Quarterly at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and holds a BA in history and government from Georgetown University as well as an MA in the History of International Relations from the London School of Economics with a focus on Political Islam. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Leonardo Ferreira is an associate professor of the Electronic Media Program at the University of Miami. A multimedia journalism lead researcher in rural communication projects in both the Dominican Republic and Colombia, he is the author of Centuries of Silence: The Story of Latin American Journalism. He has been a consultant for the Inter American Press Association, UNICEF, CIESPAL (the International Center of Higher Communication Studies for Latin America, Quito, Ecuador) and the Dominican Fundación Global Democracia y Desarrollo (FUNGLODE), among others. His studies focus on media law, communication development, and indigenous press issues. He holds a PhD from Michigan State University in Mass Media studies and a JD degree from the National University of Colombia. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Thomas Gold is a former assistant professor of comparative politics at Sacred Heart University and author of The Lega Nord and Contemporary Politics in Italy. He earned his PhD from the New School for Social Research and received a Fulbright Fellowship to conduct research in Italy. He served as a Southern Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Heloiza Golbspan Herscovitz is an associate professor in the department of journalism at California State University of Long Beach. Her research centers on newsroom culture, professional routines, news values, media roles, and online journalism. She is a veteran Brazilian journalist with extensive experience for several publications, including the daily O Estado de S. Paulo and Nova, Cosmopolitan’s Portuguese edition. Her prior teaching experience includes an appointment at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication of Florida International University, Miami, where she coordinated the Spanish-Language Master’s in Investigative Journalism between 2000 and 2003. She has also taught at two prestigious journalism programs in Brazil:  PUC-RS of Porto Alegre, in the early 1990s, and UFSC of Florianopolis, from 2003 to 2006. She was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Florida, where she got a PhD in Mass Communications in 2000. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Deborah Horan is a former journalist with the Chicago Tribune and the Houston Chronicle. She spent eight years in the Middle East covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the region, including Iraq and Jordan, for the Chronicle before returning to the United States as a 2002 Knight Wallace Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan to study the rise of the al-Jazeera Satellite Channel. She joined the Tribune in 2002 and covered the American Muslim immigrant community and the Iraq war in 2003 and 2004. She is currently based in Washington, where she works as a Middle East analyst. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Sallie Hughes, PhD, is the director of degree programs (MA, BA) in Latin American Studies at the University of Miami. She is also an associate professor in the Journalism Program at the university. She is the author of Newsrooms in Conflict: Journalism and the Democratization of Mexico (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2006) and Redacciones en conflicto. Periodismo y democratización en México (University of Guadalajara, M.A. Porrua, 2009). She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Nuray Inal is currently a Displacement Monitoring Assistant with the International Organization for Migration Iraq, based out of Amman, Jordan. She has previously worked at International Crisis Group, the US Department of State, and National Defense University. She speaks Turkish, German, and Arabic and holds a MA in International Affairs from Columbia University. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Ana Jelenkovic is a political and economic analyst focusing on Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Southeast and Central Europe. She holds an MA in international relations from Columbia University. She has worked as an analyst at Eurasia Group in New York and London, and on human rights and media issues at the Committee to Protect Journalists, the Harriman Institute, the Open Society Institute, and Freedom House’s New York and Belgrade offices. She served as a Balkans and Caucasus analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Karin Deutsch Karlekar is a senior researcher at Freedom House and managing editor of the Freedom of the Press index. She has conducted research and advocacy missions on press freedom, human rights, and governance issues to a number of countries in Africa and South Asia and has written reports for several Freedom House publications. In addition, she speaks widely on press freedom, new media, and media indicators issues, and developed the methodology for Freedom House’s pilot index of internet freedom, released in 2009. She also served as chair of the governing council of the International Freedom of Expression Exchange network from 2006 to 2009. She holds a PhD in Indian history from Cambridge University and previously worked as a consultant for Human Rights Watch. She served as a South Asia and Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Abraham Kim is vice president at the Korean Economic Institute. Previously, he was the research manager of government services and the principal Korea analyst at Eurasia Group. He has published a number of articles in major newspapers including the Asian Wall Street Journal, the Washington Times, Joongang Ilbo, and the Korea Times, and has appeared on CNBC, Fox Business, and BNN-TV. He was a project manager for Science Application International Corporation (SAIC) and a policy analyst at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He received his PhD in political science from Columbia University. He served as an East Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Daniel Kimmage is an independent consultant and senior fellow at the Homeland Security Policy Institute in Washington, DC. Previously, he was a regional analyst at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, where he focused on politics, business, and media issues in Central Asia and Russia. He coauthored Iraqi Insurgent Media: The War of Images and Ideas (2007) and authored The Al-Qaeda Media Nexus (2008). His work has appeared in the New York Times, the New Republic, Foreign Policy, and Slate. He holds an MA in Russian and Islamic history from Cornell University. He served as a Central Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
John Kubiniec is a partner in Klos Training, a company specializing in building communication skills. He was formerly Freedom House’s regional director for Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and also served as a board member of Freedom House Europe. He studied economics and Slavic languages and speaks Russian and Polish. He served as an Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Astrid Larson is a language coordinator at the French Institute Alliance Française. She has an MA in international affairs from the New School University and a BA from Smith College. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Christianna Nichols Leahy is professor of Comparative Politics in the Department of Political Science and International Studies which she chairs at McDaniel College.  She has long been a country expert on Lusophone Africa for Amnesty International. She has served as a member of AIUSA’s Board of Directors for several times over the last twenty years. She holds a PhD from Georgetown University in Comparative Government and she has advanced training in International Humanitarian Law from the ICRC, the Institute for Humanitarian Law in San Remo, Italy, and from Harvard University’s Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research.  She served as a Sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Charles Liebling is a human rights consultant specializing in self-determination, minority rights, the Balkans, and Africa. Over the last few years he has observed elections for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe in Ukraine, Bosnia, Serbia, and Macedonia, and he maintains a blog on the Western Sahara. His education includes graduate degrees from the Monterey Institute of International Studies and the New School for Social Research, as well as a certificate in human rights law from the International Institute for Human Rights in Strasbourg. He served as a Sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Alexander Lupis is a journalist and human rights researcher who is fluent in Russian and Serbo-Croatian. During the 1990s, he worked for the International Organization for Migration, the Open Society Institute, Human Rights Watch, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, focusing on human rights issues in the former Yugoslavia. More recently, he worked as the Europe and Central Asia program coordinator at the Committee to Protect Journalists, followed by a one-year fellowship in Moscow at the Russian Union of Journalists. He served as a former Soviet republics analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Ekaterina Lysova is a human rights lawyer from the Russian Far East who holds a PhD in law from Far Eastern State University. She spent five years working as a media lawyer for the Press Development Institute and for the IREX Media Program in Vladivostok and Moscow. After serving as a full-time researcher at the University of Cologne’s Institute for East European Law, she now works as a researcher for the Moscow Media Policy & Law Institute. She served as a former Soviet republics analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Eleanor Marchant is currently a Program Officer at the Media Development Loan Fund, a New York-based nonprofit that supports independent journalism in developing countries. A former research analyst and assistant editor of the Freedom of the Press survey at Freedom House, Eleanor has also served as a Visiting Fellow at The Media Institute, an East Africa press freedom organization based in Kenya, where she covered the December 2007 presidential election. She holds an M.A. in international relations from New York University, where she wrote her thesis on democratization and mediain West Africa, and received a BSc in economics and politics from the University of Bristol in England. She served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Peter G. Mwesige is the executive director of the African Centre for Media Excellence (ACME). He is also a member of Sub-Saharan Africa Advisory Board of the International Journalism Fellowships of the International Center for Journalists and a member of the governing board of the Independent Media Council of Uganda. A holder of a PhD in Mass Communications from Indiana University and a Master’s degree in Journalism & Mass Communication from the American University in Cairo, Mwesige was until November 2007 the head of the Department of Mass Communication at Makerere University, where he was also a senior lecturer. He has previously worked as a reporter, news editor, political editor, and political columnist, including positions as executive editor of the Daily Monitor and group training editor of the Nation Media Group in Kampala. He served as an East Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Folu Ogundimu is a professor of journalism and former senior research associate for Afrobarometer at Michigan State University (MSU). He holds a PhD in mass communication from Indiana University at Bloomington and is coeditor of Media and Democracy in Africa. He was founding director of the Ghana Multidisciplinary Studies Program at MSU. He served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Ory Okolloh is a Kenyan lawyer and blogger. She is a graduate of Harvard Law School and blogs at KenyanPundit.com. She is the cofounder of Kenya’s Parliament watch website Mzalendo.com and the website Ushahidi.com, which allowed people to report atrocities committed in Kenya after the recent elections and is now being used as a tool in numerous other settings. She was a contributor to the book Worldchanging: A User’s Guide for the 21st Century and is a frequent speaker at conferences, including Ted Global Africa and Poptech. When she is not working on her projects, she consults on digital access and citizen journalism issues. She served as a Sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Sanja Pesek is a PhD candidate at the Central European University political science department. She has worked with Freedom House Budapest and Belgrade on democracy-building, civil society development, protection and promotion of human rights and transitional justice issues in the countries of former Yugoslavia. She served as a Southeast Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Aili Piano is a senior researcher at Freedom House and managing editor of Freedom in the World. She was a country report author for several editions of Nations in Transit, a Freedom House survey of democratization in Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia, and for Freedom House’s Countries at the Crossroads 2004 survey of democratic governance. Before joining Freedom House, she worked as a diplomatic attaché at the Estonian Mission to the United Nations. She holds an MA from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. She served as the Baltic states analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Arch Puddington is director of research at Freedom House and coeditor of Freedom in the World. He has written widely on American foreign policy, race relations, organized labor, and the history of the cold war. He is the author of Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty and Lane Kirkland: Champion of American Labor. He served as the United States analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Courtney C. Radsch is a Senior Program Officer for Freedom House’s Global Freedom of Expression Campaign. She has extensive journalism and new media experience in the U.S., Middle East, and Europe, including conducting media and advocacy training (journalism, public relations, cross cultural communications and digital/social media), leading civil society delegations and advocacy missions, and international media development. Ms. Radsch has held positions with Al Arabiya in Dubai, the New York Times, the Daily Star in Lebanon, and the Development Executive Group, and is currently also a doctoral candidate at American University writing her dissertation on cyberactivism in Egypt. She holds a B.A. degree in Mass Communication from the University of California, Berkeley and a Masters degree from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
David Robie is associate professor of journalism in the School of Communication Studies at New Zealand’s Auckland University of Technology and director of the Pacific Media Centre. He holds a master’s in journalism from the University of Technology, Sydney, and a PhD in history/politics from the University of the South Pacific, Fiji, where he was former coordinator of the Pacific Region Journalism Program. Dr. Robie was awarded the Pacific Islands Media Association Pacific Media Freedom Award in 2005. He is founding editor of Pacific Journalism Review, convener of Pacific Media Watch, and has written several books on Pacific media, including Mekim Nius: South Pacific Media, Politics, and Education. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Mark Y. Rosenberg is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on dominant party systems, political economy, and democratization in sub-Saharan Africa. He is a former Researcher at Freedom House and Assistant Editor of Freedom in the World. He served as a Southern Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Tyler Roylance is a staff editor at Freedom House and the line editor for Freedom in the World. He holds an MA in history from New York University. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for both Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press.
 
Sara Schonhardt is a freelance journalist specializing in Southeast Asian politics and economics. She has lived and reported on the region since 2003, covering events such as the 2004 Asian tsunami, coup attempts in Thailand, and the effects of poverty and participatory development in Cambodia and Indonesia. She holds an MA in international affairs from Columbia University and contributes to US-based media outlets including the Christian Science Monitor and the Voice of America. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Janet Steele is an associate professor of journalism in the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. She received her PhD in history from Johns Hopkins University and has taught courses on the theory and practice of journalism in Southeast and South Asia as a Fulbright senior scholar and lecturer. Her book Wars Within: The Story of Tempo, an Independent Magazine in Soeharto’s Indonesia focuses on Tempo magazine and its relationship to the politics and culture of new-order Indonesia. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Nicole Stremlau is Coordinator of the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford where she is also a Research Fellow in the Centre of Socio-Legal Studies. She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics in development studies. Her research focuses on media policy during and in the aftermath of guerrilla struggles in the Horn of Africa. She served as an East Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Thomas Webb is a recent graduate of Fordham Law School. He is currently a Visiting Attorney at Public Advocates, a San Francisco based non-profit law firm. He was formerly a research assistant at Freedom House. He served as a South Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
Eliza Young is a research analyst and the assistant editor for Freedom in the World. She holds an MA in international relations from King’s College London. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.
 
 
Ratings Review Advisers:
 
Jon B. Alterman is director of the Middle East Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. He received his PhD in history from Harvard University, and he has worked on the personal staff of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan and on the policy-planning staff at the U.S. Department of State. He is the author of New Media, New Politics?: From Satellite Television to the Internet in the Arab World.He served as a Middle East and North Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press
 
Aseem Chhabra is a freelance writer who writes on a variety of topics, including arts, entertainment, social, and political issues. He has been published in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Courier-Journal, and Time Out New York. He writes a weekly column for Mumbai Mirror, a Mumbai based daily newspaper, and also contributes regularly to two Indian-American outlets, India Abroad and Rediff.com. He also serves as an elected member of the board of the South Asian Journalists Association, a North America based organization that fosters accurate reporting of South Asian news. He holds an MS degree in Journalism from Columbia University and an MBA from Boston University. He served as a South Asia adviser for Freedom of the Press.
 
Sheila S. Coronel is Toni Stabile Professor of Professional Practice in Investigative Journalism at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. She was co-founder and director of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism and helped set up the Southeast Asian Press Alliance. She is also on the board of the Committee to Protect Journalists. She has written and edited more than a dozen books on Philippine politics, corruption, media and freedom of information. She served as Southeast Asia adviser for Freedom of the Press.
 
Howard W. French is an associate professor of journalism at Columbia University and a fellow of the Open Society Foundations. He received his BA from the University of Massachusetts–Amherst, and has worked as a French-English translator in Abidjan, Ivory Coast and taught English literature at the University of Ivory Coast. His career in journalism began as a freelance reporter for The Washington Post and many other publications in West Africa. From 1990 to 2008 he reported for The New York Times as bureau chief for Central America and the Caribbean, West Africa, Japan and the Koreas, and China. During this time, his work was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He is also the author of A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa (2004). He served as a Sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.
 
Marwan M. Kraidy is an expert on Arab media and an associate professor of global communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. His most recent books are Reality Television and Arab Politics: Contention in Public Life, Arab Television Industries, and The Politics of Reality Television: Global Perspectives. Previously Kraidy was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and director of the Arab Media and Public Life project, both in Washington, D.C, and a visiting scholar at the Annenberg School. He served as a Middle East and North Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.
 
Devra Moehler is Assistant Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on political communication, communication, and development, African politics, political behavior, democratization, comparative research design, field research methodology, and statistical analysis. Her book Distrusting Democrats: Outcomes of Participatory Constitution Making (University of Michigan Press, 2008), examines the effects of participation on the political culture of ordinary citizens. Previously, Moehler worked as a Democracy Fellow in USAID’s Office of Democracy and Governance where she helped initiate a pilot impact evaluation program. She served as an Sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.
 
Robert Orttung is the president of the Resource Security Institute and a visiting scholar at the Center for Security Studies at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. Orttung is a co-editor of the Russian Analytical Digest, a biweekly newsletter that examines political and economic developments in Russia (http://www.res.ethz.ch/analysis/rad/) and the Caucasus Analytical Digest (http://www.res.ethz.ch/analysis/cad/index.cfm). Previously he worked at the Jefferson Institute; American University’s Terrorism, Transnational Crime, and Corruption Center; the EastWest Institute; and the Open Media Research Institute. He earned a PhD in Political Science from UCLA and a BA from Stanford University. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union adviser for Freedom of the Press
 
Bettina Peters is director of the Global Forum for Media Development, a network of organizations involved in media assistance programs around the world. Until 2007, she worked as director of programs at the European Journalism Center (EJC), in charge of its international journalism training program. Before joining the EJC, she worked for 10 years at the International Federation of Journalists headquarters in Brussels. She holds degrees in political science and journalism from the University of Hamburg and has edited several publications on journalism, such as the EJC’s handbook on civic journalism. In 2009, she wrote “Future of Journalism and Challenges for Media Development: Are We Exporting a Model that No Longer Works At Home?” She served as Western Europe adviser for Freedom of the Press
 
Gary Rawnsley is Professor of Asian International Communications at the University of Leeds, UK. He has published widely in the areas of international communication, democratisation, election campaigning and the media in Asia, especially China and Taiwan. He has held visiting positions in Taiwan, Hong Kong and Australia, and was the founding Dean of the University of Nottingham Ningbo, China (2005-7). He served as East Asia adviser for Freedom of the Press.
 
Byron T. Scott is professor emeritus of journalism and director emeritus of the European Union Center at the University of Missouri at Columbia and is a former newspaper and magazine journalist. His special area of interest is the media in transitional nations of the former Soviet bloc. He has worked as a journalist and teacher of journalism throughout the former Soviet bloc, including stints at the American University in Bulgaria, the University of Tirana, Tbilisi State University, and Moscow State University. Currently he heads the Journalism Division of the Open Society Institute’s Academic Fellowship Program. He served as Central and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union adviser for Freedom of the Press
 
Silvio Waisbord is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Programs in the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. He also serves as editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Press/Politics. He is the author of Watchdog Journalism in South America, and El Gran Desfile, and co-editor of Media and Globalization: Why the State Matters and Latin Politics, Global Media. He has also published in leading academic journals, and has edited books, newspapers, and newsweeklies. He was a fellow at the Annenberg School for communication (1993-4), and the Media Studies Center (1998). He served as Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.