Freedom of the Press 2011 - Survey Team | Freedom House

Survey Team

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Contributing Analysts

Ben Akoh is an expert on media and technology policy, conducting research and capacity building on the development and deployment of  information and communications technologies (ICTs) and the internet, in Africa and globally. He is also currently involved in various capacities at national and regional internet governance processes. Mr. Akoh is a graduate student at the University of Manitoba where he is exploring the nexus of education, culture, and the internet and facilitating extended education courses on emerging internet technologies and digital literacy. He has been instrumental in various media capacity building initiatives in Africa including the shaping of the African Elections Project, and has participated in several election and media dialogues with various pro-democracy and media institutions in Africa. He has worked with the Open Society Initiative for West Africa, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and in the private sector. He served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Roby Alampay is currently Senior Manager for New Media at TV5, a broadcasting network in the Philippines, for which he is also editor-in-chief of its online news portal, InterAksyon.com. From 2004 to 2010 he was executive director of the Southeast Asian Press Alliance (SEAPA), the only regional organization advocating for press freedom in Southeast Asia. A graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, his opinion articles, particularly on human rights and free expression issues, have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Hong Kong Standard, The Guardian, and the leading newspapers throughout Southeast Asia. In 2009 he was awarded as one of the Ten Outstanding Young Men of the Philippines for his advocacy work for democracy and human rights. He served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Charles Arthur is an analyst and journalist specializing in Caribbean politics and economics. He holds an MA in Latin American government and politics from the University of Essex, United Kingdom. He is a contributing writer for the Economist Intelligence Unit, and is editor of the quarterly magazine, Making It: Industry for Development. He is the author of two books about Haiti. He served as a Caribbean analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Luis Manuel Botello is the senior director of special projects at the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), where he is responsible for developing strategies for expanding ICFJ’s work and overseas monitoring and evaluation systems. He worked for ten years as ICFJ’s Latin American program director and launched the ICFJ’s International Journalism Network (IJNet), an online media assistance news service. Botello previously served as morning newscast producer, host, and television reporter for Televisora Nacional in Panama, where he covered assignments in Colombia, the United States, and Europe. He is a board member of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin and the Latin American Journalism Center (CELAP) in Panama City, Panama. He was a Fulbright Scholar at Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Mass Communication, where he got his BA in Broadcast Journalism and M.A. in Mass Communications. He served as the Central America analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Jake Dizard is a doctoral student in comparative politics at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the former managing editor of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s survey of democratic governance. His area of focus is Latin America, with a specific emphasis on the Andean region. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Camille Eiss is the Policy Director for the Truman National Security Project. Camille previously worked as a senior associate for the international development organization Endeavor and as a research analyst at Freedom House and Assistant Editor of Freedom in the World. Her research focused primarily on political and human rights developments in Southeast Asia. Camille was an editor of The Washington Quarterly at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and holds a BA in history and government from Georgetown University as well as an MA in the History of International Relations from the London School of Economics with a focus on Political Islam. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sam Feldman is a freelance journalist in New York City. He received a BA in Linguistics from the University of Chicago, with a minor in Slavic Languages. He was a press freedom research intern at Freedom House from January to September 2011. He served as an Eastern Europe and Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Leonardo Ferreira is an associate professor of the Electronic Media Program at the University of Miami. A UNESCO consultant in Central America and multimedia journalism lead researcher in rural communication projects in both the Dominican Republic and Colombia, he is the author of Centuries of Silence: The Story of Latin American Journalism. He has also worked as media adviser for the Inter American Press Association, UNICEF, CIESPAL, and the Dominican Fundación Global Democracia y Desarrollo (FUNGLODE), among others. His research focuses on media law, communication for development, and Latin American media history and ethnicity, especially indigenous press issues. He holds a PhD from Michigan State University in Mass Media studies and a JD degree from the National University of Colombia. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Catherine A. Fitzpatrick is a writer for EurasiaNet.org, a web news service about current events in Central Asia, where she edits the blogs and weekly newsletters about Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. She also frequently contributes to Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. She has translated many books from Russian to English including the works of Boris Yeltsin, Vladimir Putin, Eduard Shevardnadze, Alexander Yakovlev and other Russian modern and historical political leaders and journalists. A long-time human rights advocate specializing on the former Soviet Union and civil societies, she has worked as a researcher for a number of non-governmental organizations including Freedom House, Human Rights Watch, the Committee to Protect Journalists, and the International League for Human Rights. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Julia Breslin Foster is partner at Foster & Hannaford, LLP, in Massachusetts where she practices international human rights law, asylum law, and immigration law. She is also a former research and editorial associate for the Freedom House publication Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa. Her research focus is the Middle East, and she has carried out field research in Kuwait, Bahrain, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. She holds a law degree from Florida State University and an LL.M. in international human rights law from Lund University, Sweden, a program taught in conjunction with the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Thomas Gold is the Director of External Affairs at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools at NYU. Dr. Gold is a former assistant professor of comparative politics at Sacred Heart University and author of The Lega Nord and Contemporary Politics in Italy. He earned his PhD from the New School for Social Research and received a Fulbright Fellowship to conduct research in Italy. He served as a Southern Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sylvana Habdank-Kolaczkowska is project director of Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance from Central Europe to Central Asia. Before joining Freedom House, she worked as the Managing Editor of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a peer-reviewed quarterly based on archival research in the former Communist world. She holds an MA from Harvard University in Regional Studies of Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, and a BA in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley. She served as a Central Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Jennifer Hetrick is an MPA candidate at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs specializing in International Media Advocacy and Communications. She has contributed to the recent Freedom House special report, License to Censor: The Use of Media Regulation to Restrict Press Freedom, and served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Deborah Horan is a former journalist with the Chicago Tribune and the Houston Chronicle. She spent eight years in the Middle East covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the region, including Iraq and Jordan, before returning to the United States as a 2002 Knight Wallace Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan to study the rise of the al-Jazeera Satellite Channel. She joined the Tribune in 2002 and covered the American Muslim immigrant community and the Iraq war in 2003 and 2004. She is currently based in Washington, where she works as a Middle East analyst. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sallie Hughes, PhD, is an associate professor in the Journalism Program at the University of Miami.  She is the author of Newsrooms in Conflict: Journalism and the Democratization of Mexico (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2006) and Redacciones en conflicto. Periodismo y democratización en México (University of Guadalajara, M.A. Porrua, 2009). She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Lars Christian Hvidberg is a journalist and writer from Copenhagen, Denmark. He received his M.S. in journalism from Columbia University and has worked as freelance reporter, blogger and columnist for the Danish newspaper Berlingske in both Denmark and Washington D.C. He has written extensively on issues such as free speech, politics and the Internet, and is a member of the Danish free speech society Fri Debat. He currently works as speechwriter and press officer for the Danish Ministry of Culture. He served as a Northern Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ana Jelenkovic is a political and economic analyst focusing on Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Southeast and Central Europe. She holds an MA in international relations from Columbia University. She has worked as an analyst at Eurasia Group in New York and London, and on human rights and media issues at the Committee to Protect Journalists, the Harriman Institute, the Open Society Institute, and Freedom House’s New York and Belgrade offices. She served as a Balkans and Caucasus analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Rajan Kapoor is currently project manager with Management Systems International where he oversees the implementation of USAID funded Democracy and Governance projects. He has extensive experience working on issues of civic participation and democracy building in Africa as well as Latin America. Rajan received his Master in International Affairs from the School of International Affairs at Columbia University where he focused on International Economic and Political Development. He served as an Africa analyst for the Freedom of the Press.

Karin Deutsch Karlekar is a senior researcher at Freedom House and managing editor of the Freedom of the Press index. She has conducted research and advocacy missions on press freedom, human rights, and governance issues to a number of countries in Africa and South Asia and has written reports for several Freedom House publications. In addition, she speaks widely on press freedom, new media, and media indicators issues, and developed the methodology for Freedom House’s pilot index of internet freedom, released in 2009. She holds a PhD in Indian history from Cambridge University and previously worked as a consultant for Human Rights Watch. She served as a South Asia and Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Amy Killian is an independent consultant for democracy and rights groups in India. She presently works with the Liberty Institute of New Delhi expanding their Empowering India initiative to improve transparency in Indian elections. She is a former staff member of Freedom House-Washington and has worked on their Southeast Asia, Exchanges, and Advocacy programs. Prior to Freedom House, she was a Fellow with Kiva Microfunds in Cambodia. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Astrid Larson is a language coordinator at the French Institute Alliance Française. She has an MA in international affairs from the New School University and a BA from Smith College. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Charles Liebling is a human rights consultant specializing in self-determination, minority rights, the Balkans, and Africa. Over the last few years he has observed elections for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Bosnia, Serbia, Macedonia, and Ukraine, and for the Carter Center in South Sudan and Tunisia. He also maintains a blog on the Western Sahara. His education includes graduate degrees from the Monterey Institute of International Studies and the New School for Social Research, as well as a certificate in human rights law from the International Institute for Human Rights in Strasbourg. He served as a Sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Alexander Lupis is a journalist and human rights researcher who is fluent in Russian and Serbo-Croatian. During the 1990s, he worked for the International Organization for Migration, the Open Society Institute, Human Rights Watch, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, focusing on human rights issues in the former Yugoslavia. More recently, he worked as the Europe and Central Asia program coordinator at the Committee to Protect Journalists, followed by a one-year fellowship in Moscow at the Russian Union of Journalists. He served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ekaterina Lysova is a human rights lawyer from the Russian Far East who holds a PhD in law from Far Eastern State University. She spent five years working as a media lawyer for the Press Development Institute and for the IREX Media Program in Vladivostok and Moscow. After serving as a full-time researcher at the University of Cologne’s Institute for East European Law, she now works as a researcher for the Moscow Media Policy & Law Institute. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Eleanor Marchant is currently the Annenberg Researcher for the Programme in Comparative Media Law & Policy (PCMLP) at Oxford University where she is conducting research on the Somali media and diaspora and has organized a number of academic and policy workshops related to this and other subjects. Prior to that, Eleanor served as a Program Officer at the Media Development Loan Fund (MDLF), a New York-based nonprofit that funds developing world journalism. She was also a Visiting Fellow at the Media Institute, an East African press freedom organization based in Kenya, during the 2007 election. A former research assistant at Freedom House, she served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Peter G. Mwesige is the executive director of the African Centre for Media Excellence (ACME). He is also a member of Sub-Saharan Africa Advisory Board of the International Journalism Fellowships of the International Center for Journalists and a member of the governing board of the Independent Media Council of Uganda. A holder of a PhD in Mass Communications from Indiana University and a Master’s degree in Journalism & Mass Communication from the American University in Cairo, Mwesige was until November 2007 the head of the Department of Mass Communication at Makerere University, where he was also a senior lecturer. He has previously worked as a reporter, news editor, political editor, and political columnist, including positions as executive editor of the Daily Monitor and group training editor of the Nation Media Group in Kampala. He served as an East Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Folu Ogundimu is a professor of journalism and former senior research associate for Afrobarometer at Michigan State University (MSU). He holds a PhD in mass communication from Indiana University at Bloomington and is coeditor of Media and Democracy in Africa. He was founding director of the Ghana Multidisciplinary Studies Program at MSU. He served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Aili Piano is project director of Freedom in the World. She was a country report author for several editions of Nations in Transit, a Freedom House survey of democratization in Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia, and for Freedom House’s Countries at the Crossroads 2004 survey of democratic governance. Before joining Freedom House, she worked as a diplomatic attaché at the Estonian Mission to the United Nations. She holds an MA from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. She served as the Baltic states analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Valerie Popper is pursuing a master’s degree in Diplomacy and International relations from Seton Hall University. She holds a BS in Journalism from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. She served as a Western Europe and Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Arch Puddington is director of research at Freedom House and coeditor of Freedom in the World. He has written widely on American foreign policy, race relations, organized labor, and the history of the cold war. He is the author of Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty and Lane Kirkland: Champion of American Labor. He served as the United States analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Courtney C. Radsch is a Senior Program Officer for Freedom House’s Global Freedom of Expression Campaign. She has extensive journalism and new media experience in the U.S., Middle East, and Europe, including conducting media and advocacy training (journalism, public relations, cross cultural communications and digital/social media), leading civil society delegations and advocacy missions, and international media development. Ms. Radsch has held positions with Al Arabiya in Dubai, the New York Times, the Daily Star in Lebanon, and the Development Executive Group, and is currently also a doctoral candidate at American University writing her dissertation on cyberactivism in Egypt. She holds a B.A. degree in Mass Communication from the University of California, Berkeley and a Masters degree from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mara Revkin is the Assistant Director of the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East. Prior to joining the Atlantic Council in 2011, Mara worked for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where she was a Junior Fellow in the Middle East Program focusing on Egypt and Yemen. Mara was a 2009 Fulbright Fellow to Oman, where she studied the constraints on freedom of speech and expression in authoritarian regimes. She graduated from Swarthmore College with a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science and Arabic. Her current research interests include Egyptian politics and constitutional and legal systems in the Middle East. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

David Robie is associate professor of journalism in the School of Communication Studies at New Zealand’s Auckland University of Technology and director of the Pacific Media Centre. He holds an MA in journalism from the University of Technology, Sydney, and a PhD in history/politics from the University of the South Pacific, Fiji, where he was former coordinator of the Pacific Region Journalism Program. Dr. Robie was awarded the Pacific Islands Media Association Pacific Media Freedom Award in 2005. He is founding editor of Pacific Journalism Review, convener of Pacific Media Watch, and has written several books on Pacific media, including Mekim Nius: South Pacific Media, Politics, and Education. Dr Robie also publishes the media freedom blog Café Pacific at www.cafepacific.blogspot.com.  He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mark Y. Rosenberg is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on dominant party systems, political economy, and democratization in sub-Saharan Africa. He is a former Researcher at Freedom House and Assistant Editor of Freedom in the World. He served as a Southern Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Tyler Roylance is a staff editor at Freedom House and is involved in a number of its publications. He holds an MA in history from New York University. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for both Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press.

Javier Sierra is a former journalist with CNN, Associated Press, Univision News, and United Press International. For 11 years, Javier has worked on a consultant basis as projects director of the World Press Freedom Committee, leading the Committee’s efforts to eradicate repressive insult and criminal defamation laws in many parts of the world, especially in Latin America. He has lectured about press freedom at several fora, including plenary sessions of the Organization of American States, the Coordinating Committee of Press Freedom Organizations, and the American Society of Newspaper Editors. He has also been professionally involved with other human rights organizations, such as the Center for Justice and Accountability, the International Center for Journalists, and the Crimes of War Project. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Janet Steele is an associate professor of journalism in the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. She received her PhD in history from Johns Hopkins University and has taught courses on the theory and practice of journalism in Southeast and South Asia as a Fulbright senior scholar and lecturer. Her book Wars Within: The Story of Tempo, an Independent Magazine in Soeharto’s Indonesia focuses on Tempo magazine and its relationship to the politics and culture of new-order Indonesia. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Nicole Stremlau is Coordinator of the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford where she is also a Research Fellow in the Centre of Socio-Legal Studies. She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics in development studies. Her research focuses on media policy during and in the aftermath of guerrilla struggles in the Horn of Africa. She served as an East Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Vanessa Tucker is the project director of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. Prior to joining Freedom House, Vanessa worked at Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program, at the Kennedy School’s Program on Intrastate Conflict, and as a graduate assistant for the Carter Center’s Democracy Program. She holds an MA in international relations from Yale University. She served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Eliza B. Young is a research analyst for Freedom House. She is the assistant editor of Freedom in the World, and covers several Western and Central European countries. She holds a BA in modern European history from Barnard College at Columbia University and an MA in international relations from King’s College London. She served as a Western and Central Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.


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Jon B. Alterman is director of the Middle East Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. He received his PhD in history from Harvard University, and he has worked on the personal staff of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan and on the policy-planning staff at the U.S. Department of State. He is the author of New Media, New Politics?: From Satellite Television to the Internet in the Arab World. He served as a Middle East and North Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press

Rosental Calmon Alves holds the Knight Chair in International Journalism and the UNESCO Chair in Communication in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the founding director of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas. Since 2008, Alves has served as the president of the board of ORBICOM, a global network of the UNESCO Chairs in Communication. He holds a BA in journalism from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and was the first Brazilian to be awarded with a Nieman Fellowship to study at Harvard University. He began his academic career in the United States in 1996, after 27 years as a professional journalist, including seven years as a journalism professor in Brazil. A board member of several national and international organizations, Alves has been a frequent speaker and trainer as well as a consultant. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Ashley Esarey received his PhD in Political Science from Columbia University and held the An Wang Postdoctoral Fellowship at Harvard’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. He teaches Chinese politics at Whitman College, serves as Associate in Research at Harvard University's Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, and is a Visiting Scholar at the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies, China Program. His publications concern political communication in People’s Republic of China. He served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Daniel C. Hallin is Professor of Communication at the University of California at San Diego.  He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from U.C. Berkeley.  His books include The “Uncensored War”: The Media and Vietnam, We Keep America on Top of the World: Television News and the Public Sphere, Comparing Media Systems: Three Models of Media and Politics, and Comparing Media Systems beyond the Western World. Comparing Media Systems has received the Goldsmith Book Award of the Shorenstein Center on Press and Politics, the Diamond Anniversary Book Award of the National Communication Association and the Outstanding Book Award of the International Communication Association, and has been translated into Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Ukrainian, Hungarian Korean and Chinese. His research covers media and politics, media and war, media and public health, the history of journalistic professionalism, and comparative media systems, particularly in Europe and Latin America. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Miklos Haraszti is a Hungarian writer, editor, professor, and human rights promoter.  He was a founder of Hungary’s democratic and free press movement in the 1970s, and as a member of the Hungarian parliament in the 1990s, he authored the country's first laws on press freedom. From 2004 to 2010, he served as the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe’s Representative on Freedom of the Media. Currently, he is teaching a course on global press freedom issues at Columbia University. He served as Central and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union adviser for Freedom of the Press

Marwan M. Kraidy, an expert on Arab media and politics, is Professor of Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and the Edward Said Chair of American Studies at the American University of Beirut. He is a Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. His books include Reality Television and Arab Politics: Contention in Public Life (Cambridge, 2010), which won the 2010 Best Book Award in Global Communication and Social Change, from the International Communication Association, and the 2011 Diamond Anniversary Best Book Award from the National Communication Association; Arab Television Industries (BFI/Palgrave, 2009, with J.Khalil); and Hybridity, or, The Cultural Logic of Globalization (Temple, 2005). He served as a Middle East and North Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Kavita Menon is a senior program officer at the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), a New York-based organization that works to defend media freedom worldwide. She joined CPJ in 1998 as a research associate focused on South Asia and the Pacific. As CPJ Asia program coordinator from 1999 to 2003, she led research and advocacy missions to countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Indonesia. She left CPJ in 2003 to take up the Pew Fellowship in international reporting at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. The fellowship supported an independent reporting project in Sri Lanka. Menon worked as a researcher and campaigner on South Asia for Amnesty International before returning to CPJ in 2008. She has written for publications including The Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, International Herald Tribune, and Ms. magazine. She has produced radio features for NPR’s “All Things Considered,” Monitor Radio, WNYC, and WBAI, and previously worked as assistant producer of NPR’s “On the Media.” Menon earned a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, and a bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Berkeley. She served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Devra Moehler is Assistant Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on political communication, communication and development, African politics, political behavior, democratization, comparative research design, field research methodology, and statistical analysis. Her book Distrusting Democrats: Outcomes of Participatory Constitution Making (University of Michigan Press, 2008), examines the effects of participation on the political culture of ordinary citizens. Previously, Moehler worked as a Democracy Fellow in USAID’s Office of Democracy and Governance where she helped initiate a pilot impact evaluation program. She served as an Sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Bettina Peters is director of the Global Forum for Media Development, a network of organizations involved in media assistance programs around the world. Until 2007, she worked as director of programs at the European Journalism Center (EJC), in charge of its international journalism training program. Before joining the EJC, she worked for 10 years at the International Federation of Journalists headquarters in Brussels. She holds degrees in political science and journalism from the University of Hamburg and has edited several publications on journalism, such as the EJC’s handbook on civic journalism. In 2009, she wrote “Future of Journalism and Challenges for Media Development: Are We Exporting a Model that No Longer Works At Home?” She served as Western Europe adviser for Freedom of the Press

Byron T. Scott is professor emeritus of journalism and director emeritus of the European Union Center at the University of Missouri at Columbia and is a former newspaper and magazine journalist. His special area of interest is the media in transitional nations of the former Soviet bloc. He has worked as a journalist and teacher of journalism throughout the former Soviet bloc, including stints at the American University in Bulgaria, the University of Tirana, Tbilisi State University, and Moscow State University. Currently he heads the Journalism Division of the Open Society Institute’s Academic Fellowship Program. He served as Central and Eastern Europe/former Soviet Union adviser for Freedom of the Press