Freedom of the Press 2017

Survey Team

RESEARCH AND EDITORIAL TEAM

Elen Aghekyan, Research Analyst
Rukmani Bhatia, Research Coordinator
Rebeka Foley, Research Analyst
Jennifer Dunham, Director of Research
Shannon O’Toole, Editor
Sarah Repucci, Senior Director for Global Publications
Tyler Roylance, Staff Editor

 

ANALYSTS

Abdullahi Tasiu Abubakar is a lecturer in the Department of Journalism at City University London. He received his PhD from the University of Westminster in London and was a visiting research fellow at the university’s Africa Media Centre. He has extensive experience in print, broadcast, and online journalism both in West Africa and in the United Kingdom. He has worked for the BBC World Service in Nigeria as the Abuja bureau editor, and in Britain as a producer. He is editor at large for the Nigeria-based Daily Trust and writes regularly for the BBC. His key interests are transnational audiences, public diplomacy, and media in Africa. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Bhanu Bhakta Acharya is a scholar affiliated with the Department of Communication at the University of Ottawa. Serving as the human rights and communication officer at the National Human Rights Commission of Nepal for seven years, Mr. Acharya has made a significant contribution to press freedom and the right to freedom of expression in Nepal. An author of five books on journalism and mass communication, Mr. Acharya has also published nearly a dozen research articles in international journals, and regularly contributes articles to various newspapers. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

David Angeles is a program officer for Southeast Asia at the National Endowment for Democracy, a private, nonprofit foundation dedicated to the growth and strengthening of democratic institutions around the world. Previously, he worked in Thailand and Burma/Myanmar with various civil society and human rights groups. He received a master’s degree in international affairs from the American University of Paris and a bachelor’s degree in international studies from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he was named a Truman Scholar. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mokhtar Awad is a research fellow at George Washington University’s Center for Cyber and Homeland Security. His work focuses on regional politics in the Middle East, with a special emphasis on emerging violent extremist organizations. He has published analyses and conducted field research on Islamist groups and political dynamics in Tunisia, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and Egypt. Previously, he served as a research associate at the Center for American Progress and as a junior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Eloïse Bertrand is a PhD candidate in Politics and International Studies at the University of Warwick, focusing on opposition party politics in Burkina Faso and Uganda. She holds a master’s degree in African politics from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. She is cofounder of AREA Consulting, a company offering research, analysis, and evaluation services in and on sub-Saharan Africa, and has extensively contributed to Africa in FactAfrican Arguments, the Africa Research Institute, and L’Afrique des Idées. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Michelle Betz is a senior media development specialist with more than 20 years of experience as a journalist, journalism educator, and international media development consultant. Her areas of specialty include the role of media in conflict, conflict resolution, and peace building. Before returning to the U.S. in 2016, Michelle was based overseas in Ghana, Egypt, and Austria, where she consulted for numerous international NGOs, U.N. agencies and bilateral organizations. Michelle has conducted workshops and implemented or assessed activities in more than 20 countries including: Ghana, Nepal, DRC, Burundi, Burkina Faso, Iraq, Tunisia, Algeria, Mali, Nigeria, Central African Republic and Ukraine. Michelle is an active researcher and has authored numerous book chapters and papers. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Aljaž Pengov Bitenc is a blogger, podcaster, and journalist based in Slovenia. He serves as editor-in-chief of Radio KAOS, a small multimedia radio station in Ljubljana, and is a two-time recipient of the Ljubljana Chamber of Commerce innovation award for developments in the media field. Previously, he worked on media empowerment of the Roma population in Slovenia. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Rossen Bossev is an award-winning investigative reporter and editor at Capital Weekly in Bulgaria, focusing on human rights, law enforcement, and the judiciary. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the Joseph Fourier University. He is the Bulgaria coauthor of Moving Stories, a report published by the Ethical Journalism Network, and is involved in reviewing media coverage of migration in the European Union and in 14 countries across the globe. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Alex Brockwehl is an MPA degree candidate at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Previously, he managed Freedom House projects in Latin America, which aim to support local civil society leaders and organizations in defending human rights. Alex writes frequently for the Freedom House blog, Freedom at Issue, and has been interviewed by various media outlets on regional human rights challenges and U.S. foreign policy. In 2013 he contributed to Voices in the Streets, a Freedom House special report on freedom of assembly rights and police responses to massive social protests. Prior to joining Freedom House, Alex worked as a fellow at the Yanapuma Foundation in Estero de Plátano, Ecuador, where he managed projects focused on secondary education, community development, and women’s empowerment. He holds a bachelor of arts degree from Union College. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sarah Cook is a senior research analyst covering East Asia for Freedom House and director of its China Media Bulletin, a monthly digest of news and analysis on press and internet freedom developments related to China. She is also the author of three Freedom House special reports on China, including The Battle for China’s Spirit: Religious Revival, Repression, and Resistance under Xi Jinping, published in February 2017. She received a master’s degree in politics and a master of laws degree in public international law from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, where she was a Marshall Scholar. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Juan Carlos Donoso is a senior survey researcher at the Institute for Social Research of the University of Michigan. Previously, he was the director of the Survey Research Center of the University of Illinois at Springfield, and also served as a research associate at the Pew Research Center, an associate professor of political science at Universidad San Francisco de Quito, and the country manager for Ecuador at the Latin American Public Opinion Project. He holds a PhD in political science from Vanderbilt University. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Harout Ekmanian is a journalist with extensive experience reporting from the Middle East and the South Caucasus. His work has been featured by Voice of America, TagesspiegelO GloboNear East Quarterly, and other international publications, and he has worked in media and development in Armenia with several civil society organizations. Previously, he was trained as a lawyer in Syria, and was an O’Donnell Visiting Scholar in Global Studies at Whitman College and a fellow at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University. He served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Golnaz Esfandiari is a senior correspondent with Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. She focuses on political and social developments in Iran, and ties between Iran and the United States. Her work has appeared in and has been cited by major publications, including the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Foreign Policy; she has also contributed to Freedom in the World. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Said Essoulami is president of the Morocco-based Centre for Media Freedom. He also serves as president of the Arab Freedom of Information Network and is a member of the Middle East Committee of the International Center for Journalists’ Knight International Journalism Fellowship program. Previously, he directed the Middle East and North Africa program at Article 19 in London. He has extensive research and advocacy experience in press freedom and access to information rights, particularly in the Arab states. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ana Luiza Farias is a research analyst at ISS Governance, focusing on Latin America. She has a long career in journalism and communications, with experience in daily newspapers, press and public relations in the public sector, and corporate communications in the private sector. A former Fulbright fellow, she holds a master’s degree in international relations and economics from the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at the Johns Hopkins University. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Victoria Fernández is a journalist from Uruguay who works as an editor at a national weekly newspaper. She writes about the judiciary system and freedom of expression issues. She worked at the Office of the Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and contributes to its annual Assessment of the Situation of Freedom of Expression in the Hemisphere. She has a degree in journalism from the Catholic University in Montevideo. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Marta Ferrara is the executive director of Seeds for Democracy in Paraguay. She has experience working with regional civil society organizations, and has also served as a print and radio journalist. She studied sociology at Our Lady of the Assumption Catholic University. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sumit Galhotra is a freelance journalist and communications officer for human rights and story development at the American Jewish World Service. Previously, Sumit served as senior Asia program research associate at the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), where he produced news alerts, blogs and reports, responded to journalists in distress, and participated in reporting and high-level advocacy missions to Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, and Nepal. In the past, Sumit worked at the international news desk of CNN International and helped produce Amnesty International USA’s quarterly magazine. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Heather Gilberds is a PhD candidate in the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. Her doctoral research examines the use of media to build trust and broker relationships between civil society, citizens, and the state in Liberia. She is a Fulbright recipient and a non-resident fellow at Central European University’s Centre for Media, Data, and Society. She is also an experienced development practitioner and researcher, and has led research projects related to civil society, digital development, media activism, press freedom, and transparency and accountability in Nepal, Malawi, Tanzania, Rwanda, Mali, Sierra Leone and Liberia. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press. 

Roman Golovenko is a media lawyer who works with the Institute of Mass Information in Ukraine. He received his master’s degree from the Faculty of Law at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. He frequently provides legal representation to journalists and civil activists in defamation and access to information cases, and is one of the authors of Ukraine’s 2011 access to information law. He served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ana Pastor Gonzalez holds a journalism degree from the University of Navarra, in Spain, and has worked as a local and cultural journalist for different media companies. In 2015, she completed a master’s degree in international relations from New York University. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Nalaka Gunawardene was trained as a science writer, and has pursued a career in public media and development communication in Sri Lanka and internationally for over 25 years. He is a regular analyst on social, cultural, and political impacts of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in South Asia, and now works as a columnist, media researcher, and journalist trainer. Most recently, he edited a study on the state of Sri Lanka’s media industry and profession, which was launched in mid-2016 with 99 recommendations for media sector reforms. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sylvana Habdank-Kołaczkowska is a political analyst and researcher specializing in postcommunist Europe. She has previously served as the director of Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual report on democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia, and as the managing editor of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a peer-reviewed quarterly. She received a master’s degree in Eastern European and Eurasian studies from Harvard University and a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Summer Harlow is a PhD candidate in journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. An Inter-American Foundation Grassroots Development Fellow conducting her dissertation research on the digital evolution of activist media in El Salvador, she is a journalist with more than 10 years of experience. She has reported and blogged from the United States and Latin America, covering immigration, city government, transportation, minority affairs, and press freedom issues. Her main research inquiries are related to the links between journalism and activism, with an emphasis on Latin America, digital media, alternative media, and international communication. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Franklin Hess is the coordinator of the Modern Greek Program at Indiana University, a senior lecturer at the Institute for European Studies, and codirector of a working group on the sovereign debt crisis. His scholarly work examines Greek popular culture, exploring the economic, geopolitical, and geocultural contexts of its production. His other research interests include immigration and the cinematic representation of violence. He served as the secretary of the Modern Greek Studies Association from 2007 to 2009. He holds a PhD in American studies from the University of Iowa. He is also a contributor to Freedom in the World. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Valerie Hopkins is an American journalist based in the Balkans. She currently works for the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network, where she runs Big Deal, a project that produces reporting and research about agreements between Kosovo and Serbia. Her work has appeared in Foreign Policy, Al-Jazeera, the Guardian, OpenDemocracy, and a number of other international outlets. She previously worked at the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina and served as online editor of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University and a bachelor’s in international relations from the College of William and Mary. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sa’eed Husaini is a PhD student in the Department for International Development at the University of Oxford, focusing on the intersection of urbanization, political participation, and democratic institutional development in Nigeria. He also works on research projects related to natural resource governance, security, and public sector reform in sub-Saharan Africa. He holds a master’s degree in African studies from the University of Oxford and a bachelor’s in political science and international studies from Hope College. Previously, he served as an intern at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where his research focused on electoral processes, economic development, and security in West and Central Africa. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Melanie Jakupovic is a proposal and philanthropic strategy specialist at ChildFund International in Washington, D.C. Previously, she worked as a program manager at the Center for Peacebuilding in Sanski Most, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and served as a program officer for the Global Freedom of Expression Campaign at Freedom House. She holds a master’s degree in international affairs from George Washington University with a concentration in human security and development and a regional concentration in Europe and Eurasia. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Cedric Jourde is an associate professor of political studies at the University of Ottawa. His research interests include sub-Saharan and Sahelian politics, Islam and politics, and the politics of identity in post-colonial African states. He holds a PhD in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Erick Kabendera is a freelance journalist based in Dar es Salaam who writes for international and regional publications, covering politics, trade, and the extractive industries, and regularly contributes to the East African, the Africa Report, the Economist Intelligence Unit, and Inter Press Service. He also writes for British newspapers, including the Guardian, the Observer, and the Independent. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Paul Kimumwe is a media trainer and researcher based in Kampala, Uganda, with over 15 years’ experience in journalism, media development, and human rights advocacy. His professional interests include media policy and regulation, freedom of expression, and digital rights. He is the author of Media Regulation and Practice in Uganda: A Journalists Handbook, and Djibouti: Media and the Law. He is also a member of the research steering committee for the Collaboration on International ICT Policy for East and Southern Africa (CIPESA)—publishers of the State of Internet Freedom in Africa 2016. He holds a Master of Arts degree in media and communication studies from the University of Nairobi, Kenya, and a bachelor’s degree in mass communication from Makerere University, Uganda. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Justin Koo is a lecturer in law at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine. He completed his PhD in copyright law at King’s College London. His research and teaching interests include intellectual property law, revenue law and media law. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Niklas Kossow is a PhD candidate and communications officer at the European Research Centre for Anti-Corruption and State-Building in Berlin, focusing on the use of new media tools in anticorruption movements. He holds a bachelor’s degree in European social and political studies from University College London, and a master’s degree in public policy from the Hertie School of Governance. He previously worked as a volunteer fellow for Freedom House, an advisor for Transparency International, and a consultant for the UN Development Program and the World Wide Web Foundation. He is also a contributor to Freedom in the World. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Joshua Kurlantzick is a senior fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, he was a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he focused on Southeast Asian politics and economics and China’s relations with Southeast Asia. He is a longtime journalist whose articles have appeared in Time, the New Republic, the Atlantic Monthly, Foreign Affairs, and the New Yorker, among others. He is the author of the recently released book Democracy in Retreat: The Revolt of the Middle Class and the Worldwide Decline of Representative Government. He received a bachelor’s degree in political science from Haverford College. He is also a contributor to Freedom in the World. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Edward Lemon is a postdoctoral research scholar at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University. His research focuses on security, extremism, and authoritarianism in Tajikistan. Dr. Lemon is the author of the Tajikistan chapter of Nations in Transit, and his research has been published in Central Asian Affairs, Caucasus Survey, Foreign Affairs and the Review of Middle Eastern Studies. Dr. Lemon has spent over three years working and conducting research in Tajikistan, Russia, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. He served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Besar Likmeta is the Albania editor for the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network. Previously, he served as the Albania correspondent for Balkan Insight, a reporter for the Florida Times-Union, the features editor for the Tirana Times, and the world news editor for the channel TV Ora News. He regularly contributes to international news platforms and publications, and is a recipient of the Award for Outstanding Merits in Investigative Journalism, granted by the Central European Initiative and the South East Europe Media Organisation. He studied philosophy at the University of North Florida. He served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ibrahim al-Marashi is an assistant professor of Middle Eastern history at California State University, San Marcos. His research deals with the modern history of Iraq. He is the coauthor of Iraq’s Armed Forces: An Analytical History. He obtained his PhD at the University of Oxford, completing a thesis on the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Eleanor Marchant is a PhD candidate at the Annenberg School for Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in media, information communication technologies and policy in Africa, and ethnographic research methods. She is also a research associate at the Center for Global Communication Studies and an international fellow at iHub Research in Nairobi, and advises on research projects related to technology, development, and media policy at both centers. Previously, she worked at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at Oxford University, the Media Development Investment Fund, the Media Institute in Nairobi, and Freedom House. She received a master’s degree in international relations from New York University and a bachelor’s degree in politics and economics from the University of Bristol. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Răzvan Martin is project coordinator at ActiveWatch, a media monitoring organization in Romania, as part of its FreeEx program, which aims to promote freedom of speech and media accountability. His work includes monitoring attacks on press freedom, assisting journalists or citizens in challenging restrictions on freedom of expression, contributing to the program’s press freedom reports, and helping shape media self-regulation mechanisms and legal initiatives. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Prince Murhula is the founder and director of Journalistes pour la promotion de la démocratie et des droits humains, an implementing partner of Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) in the eastern parts of the Democratic Republic of Congo. He graduated from the University of Bakuavu in South Kivu with a degree in law in 2009. Previously, he worked at Radio Maria, a local radio station, as a presenter, reporter, and its editor-in-chief. In 2010, he won the Prix JDH award from JHR. He founded a network of journalists in South Kivu, which strives to promote quality journalism on issues related to human rights and democracy in local media and communities. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Tristan Mattelart is a professor of international communication at the French Institute of the Press (IFP), University of Paris 2. His work focuses on political, social, economic, and cultural challenges of media transnationalization. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Freddy Mata Matundu was trained as a journalist at the Institut Facultaire des Sciences de l’information et de la Communication in Kinshasa, which is DRC’s main journalism school. His journalistic career began in 2006 at Congo Top FM, a major radio station in Kinshasa. His interest in issues of violence against women and girls, child abuse, and illiteracy pushed him to report from the most remote neighborhoods of Kinshasa and regions most hit by tremendous human rights violations, including Orientale and Southern and Northern Kivus. He received the Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) fellowship in 2008. In 2009, he was awarded the prestigious Lorenzo Natali Prize by the European Union for his work on the issue of the marginalized and abused “child sorcerers.” He became JHR’s country director for the DRC in 2010, and has since contributed tremendously to the organization’s success in one of the most challenging environments in which it has ever operated. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Zororo Mavindidze is a senior researcher at the Freedom of Expression Institute, a South African non-profit organization. His professional interests include innovation and technology, digital security, and media convergence. Previously, he worked in various capacities with civil society and government organizations in Southern Africa. He is a member of the Internet Society (Gauteng Chapter) and a fellow at the African School on Internet Governance. He holds a master’s degree in development studies from the University of the Western Cape. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Grant McDonald is a professional journalist and journalism trainer currently living and working in South Sudan for the Canadian-based media development organization Journalists for Human Rights (JHR). Prior to his work in West and East Africa, Grant worked as a news anchor and reporter for Talk Radio AM640 for close to a decade. In 2013 he began working in West Africa with JHR’s Liberia program, where he saw firsthand the lasting impact of the organization’s work. In 2014 he began leading JHR’s newest program, in the world’s newest nation: South Sudan. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Martijn Mos is a doctoral candidate at the Department of Government at Cornell University. His scholarly work focuses on the dynamics of shared understandings in international politics. He holds a master’s degree in European politics and society from the University of Oxford, a master’s degree in global history from the University of Vienna, and a bachelor’s degree in liberal arts and sciences from Utrecht University. He is also a contributor to Freedom in the World. He served as a Europe and Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Azra Naseem is a post-doctoral research fellow in the School of Law and Government at Dublin City University. She is the author of Dhivehi Sitee, a website providing analysis and commentary on political and social affairs of the Maldives. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Jean-Regis Nduwimana is a lecturer in communications at Lake Tanganyika University in Burundi as well as a media consultant and blogger. He received his master’s degree from the School of Communication and Performing Arts at Daystar University in Kenya. Previously, he was chief editor of the radio station CCIB FM+, producing programs that focused on economic, political, and security issues. He regularly contributes to foreign media outlets about politics and media in Burundi. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Caroline Nellemann is an international consultant specializing in digital media and democratization. Previously she has worked for Freedom House, the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, the Danish Aid Agency, and the Danish Ministry for Science, Technology, and Innovation. She holds a master’s degree in international development from Roskilde University, Denmark. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Mooya Lynn Nyaundi is a staff attorney with the Justice Defenders program at the American Bar Association Center for Human Rights, where she coordinates pro bono assistance for human rights defenders in sub-Saharan Africa. She is also a volunteer country specialist for Zambia and Namibia with Amnesty International. She has extensive experience in international and comparative law, particularly in freedoms of expression, assembly, and association as well as the right to a fair trial. She holds an LLD degree from the University of Zimbabwe and an LLM degree in international legal studies from Georgetown University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Sarah Oates is a professor and senior scholar at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland. She has published widely in the field of political communication, with a particular focus on the way in which the traditional media and the internet can support or subvert democracy in places as diverse as Russia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Her most recent book, Revolution Stalled: The Political Limits of the Internet in the Post-Soviet Sphere, analyzed the ability of the internet to contribute to freedom of speech in Russia. Her current research examines the Russian state’s strategic narrative and how media framing is distributed in the online sphere. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Steve Paulussen is an assistant professor of journalism and member of the Media, Policy & Culture research group at the University of Antwerp. His experience is in the field of journalism studies, with a focus on the use of social media in news production. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Tetiana Pechonchyk is head of the board of the Human Rights Information Center in Ukraine. She received a PhD from Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, where she focused on freedom of speech and Ukrainian mass media. She has worked as a media professional for several Ukrainian mass media, including the news agency UNIAN, and is a member of the National Union of Journalists and the Independent Media Trade Union of Ukraine. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Raul Peñaranda is a journalist, author, and advocate for freedom of expression in Bolivia. In recognition of his journalistic work and his promotion of freedom of expression, Mr. Peñaranda received Columbia University’s Cabot Award in 2015, the United Nations’ Elizabeth Neuffer Medal (bestowed by former Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon) in 2012, and Harvard University’s Nieman Fellowship in 2008. He is currently a fellow for the National Endowment of Democracy, in Washington D.C. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Nicole Phillips is an adjunct professor at the University of California’s Hastings College of the Law, a law professor at the Université de la Fondation Dr. Aristide in Port-au-Prince, and staff attorney with the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti, with a focus on rule of law and international human rights. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of California, San Diego and her JD from the University of San Francisco. She is also a contributor to Freedom in the World. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Gábor Polyák works for the University of Pécs, Institute for Communication and Media Studies as associate professor, and is the chairman of Mertek Media Monitor, a Hungarian NGO dealing with media policy issues. Before, he was research fellow at the University of Münster, Institute for Information, Telecommunication, and Media Law, from 2014 to 2016, and associate professor at the University of Pécs, Institute for Information and Communication Law, from 2001 to 2014. His educational background includes law and media studies at the University of Pécs, a master of laws degree in ICT law at the University of Vienna, and a PhD degree and habilitation at the University of Pécs. His last book is: Medienfreiheit unter Druck: Medienregulierung und Medienpolitik in Ungarn, coedited with Prof. Bernd Holznagel. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Arch Puddington is the Distinguished Fellow for Democracy Studies at Freedom House and coeditor of Freedom in the World. He has written widely on American foreign policy, race relations, organized labor, and the history of the Cold War. He is the author of Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty and Lane Kirkland: Champion of American Labor. He received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the University of Missouri, Columbia. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Rachel Pulfer has launched and led media development projects in Canada, South Sudan, Jordan, and Tanzania; has worked with Syrian journalists in Turkey; and has managed programs in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Malawi, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Prior to joining Journalists for Human Rights, Rachel was a Canadian Journalism Fellow at Massey College, and a magazine journalist of 10 years’ standing. She was the U.S. correspondent, editorial board member, and columnist for Canadian Business, Canada’s national business news magazine. Rachel has previously held positions at Investment Executive Magazine, the Montreal Gazette, and Azure magazine, and her journalism has appeared in the Walrus, Toronto Life, the Toronto Star, the Globe and Mail, the Ottawa Citizen and Maclean’s Magazine. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Andrew Rizzardi is a communications coordinator with the Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University. He previously served as a researcher with Freedom House, working extensively on press freedom issues. He holds a master’s degree in international affairs from American University’s School of International Studies. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa for Freedom of the Press.

David Robie is a professor of journalism in the School of Communication Studies at Auckland University of Technology and director of the Pacific Media Centre. He holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Technology, Sydney, and a PhD in history and politics from the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. He is founding editor of Pacific Journalism Review and convener of Pacific Media Watch, and has written several books on Pacific media, including Mekim Nius: South Pacific Media, Politics, and Education and Don’t Spoil My Beautiful Face: Media, Mayhem and Human Rights in the South Pacific. He also publishes the media freedom blog Café Pacific. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Paul Rothman is the assistant research and partnerships officer with the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA) at the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). At CIMA, Paul supports strategic partnership development and conducts research on media reform processes and multistakeholder approaches to media policy change. In 2015, he authored a CIMA report entitled The Politics of Media Development: The Importance of Engaging Government and Civil Society and contributes regularly to CIMA’s blog on media development issues. Paul received his bachelor’s degree in international relations from Drake University and his master’s degree in Asian studies from the Elliot School of International Affairs at George Washington University. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Ryan Salzman is an assistant professor of political science in the College of Arts and Sciences at Northern Kentucky University. He holds a PhD in political science from the University of North Texas, where his studies focused on news media consumption and political behavior among Latin Americans. He continues to research how individual-level media consumption affects Latin Americans via traditional news media. His recent research projects focus on social media use and protest behavior in Central American states. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Hyunjin Seo is an associate professor and Docking Faculty Scholar in the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Kansas. She has published studies in the areas of digital media, international journalism, and strategic communication. Prior to receiving her PhD from Syracuse University, she was a foreign affairs correspondent for South Korean and international media outlets. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Najib Sharifi is the director of the Afghan Journalists Safety Committee, Afghanistan’s premier journalist safety and media watchdog organization. While a medical doctor by training, Mr. Sharifi has more than a decade of experience working for leading news organizations including the New York Times, BBC, CNN, National Public Radio, and the Washington Post. Mr. Sharifi’s analysis and opinion pieces have appeared on various media outlets including Al-Jazeera English and Foreign Policy magazine. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Kamal Siddiqi is the director of the Center for Excellence in Journalism, which is part of the IBA University in Karachi. Previously, he was the editor of the Express Tribune, a national English language daily affiliated with the New York Times. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Jorge Luis Sierra is a Knight International Journalism Fellow at the International Center for Journalists. He is an expert on cyber security, and focuses on the intersection of digital security, technology, and investigative journalism. He studied international journalism at the University of Southern California, and defense policy and economics at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies, National Defense University. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Valerie Sinden previously worked at the Center for International Media Assistance at the National Endowment for Democracy as well as at Freedom House. She studied journalism at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and holds a master’s degree from the Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations at Seton Hall University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Jeffrey Smith is the executive director of Vanguard Africa and an international human rights consultant with experience in public advocacy and research. He has held prior positions at the RFK Center for Justice and Human Rights, Freedom House, the National Endowment for Democracy, the Institute for Democratic Alternatives in South Africa, and UNESCO. He has planned and conducted human rights assessment missions to a number of African countries, and has organized African delegations to the United States and UNHRC. He frequently contributes commentary to international media outlets, and has published extensively on U.S.-Africa policy and human rights issues. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Bill Snaddon is a freelance journalist and filmmaker who has covered community news for several outlets in Australia, and written features for The Big Issue. From 2012 to 2015, he worked at the Media Institute of Southern Africa in Swaziland where he trained journalists, supported the local media, and promoted free speech. During this time he wrote columns for the Times of Swaziland, often focusing on issues of press freedom and censorship. In Africa, his work has also appeared in the Mail & Guardian, the Daily Maverick and African Independent. For the past two years, Bill has worked at a national antipoverty organization in Australia, producing digital content and managing social media. Bill runs a small online business that builds websites, and in his free time he enjoys cooking lasagna. He served as an Asia-Pacific and sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Janet Steele is an associate professor of journalism in the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. She received a PhD in history from Johns Hopkins University and has taught courses on the theory and practice of journalism in Southeast and South Asia as a Fulbright senior scholar and lecturer. Her book, Wars Within: The Story of Tempo, an Independent Magazine in Soeharto’s Indonesia, focuses on Tempo magazine and its relationship with the politics and culture of New Order–era Indonesia. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Nicole Stremlau is head of the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford and a research professor at the University of Johannesburg. She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics in development studies. Her research focuses on media and conflict in the Horn of Africa. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Natalie Sykes is a JD candidate at Columbia Law School. Previously, she worked as an intern at Freedom House. She holds a master’s degree in human rights from the London School of Economics and a bachelor’s degree in international politics from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Bernard Tabaire is a media trainer and director of programs at the Kampala-based African Centre for Media Excellence, a nonprofit organization he cofounded in 2009. He is also a columnist with the Sunday Monitor, and a radio and television commentator on public and current affairs. Previously, he served as managing editor at the Daily Monitor, Uganda’s leading independent newspaper, and was a 2006–07 visiting journalist fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University. He holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology and literature in English from Makerere University in Uganda and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Judy Taing is a senior program officer at ARTICLE 19, where she specializes in free speech on the internet, hate speech and religious intolerance, access to information, and protection of human rights defenders, particularly in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Cambodia. Judy holds a master’s degree in human rights from the London School of Economics, and a bachelor’s degree in political science and development from the University of California, Berkeley. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Juan O. Tamayo retired in 2014 after 32 years as a foreign correspondent and editor at the Miami Herald and the Nuevo Herald. He has been based in Central America, the Middle East, Europe, and the Andean Region of South America. He was awarded the Maria Moors Cabot prize in 1999 for his overall work in Latin America, and won national awards from the Overseas Press Club and the Society of Professional Journalists. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Kai Thaler is a PhD candidate in the Department of Government at Harvard University and a Democracy Doctoral Fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard Kennedy School, focusing on comparative politics and international relations in Africa, Latin America, and the Lusophone countries. He has published research on Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Mozambique, Nicaragua, South Africa, and Timor-Leste. He holds master’s degrees in political science and sociology from Harvard University and the University of Cape Town, respectively, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Yale University. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Michael Toomey is a lecturer of political science at Wenzhou-Kean University in Wenzhou, China. He earned his master’s degrees in international studies and European politics from the University of Limerick and Lund University, respectively, and holds a PhD in global affairs from Rutgers University. He is also a contributor to Freedom in the World. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Snezana Trpevska is an associate professor and senior researcher at the Institute of Communication Studies, in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. She received a PhD in Sociological Sciences from “Saint Cyril and Methodius” University in Skopje. She has taught courses in Research Methods for Media and Communication and Media Law. Her research interests are ranging within the field of sociology of mass communication, media and journalism studies and media policy and regulation. She has been working for many years on different research projects related to freedom of expression and media pluralism, media concentration and broadcast regulation, audience preferences and attitudes, ethics in journalism etc. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Pedro Vaca Villareal is the executive director of the Foundation for Press Freedom. Mr. Vaca is magister in law, specialist in constitutional law, and lawyer from the National University of Colombia. He is also teacher at Los Andes University and in the Rosario University in Bogotá. He has experience as an advisor and representative of journalists in Colombia and at the Inter-American System of Human Rights. Previously, he served as the chairman of the Coordination Committee of the IFEX network for Latin America and the Caribbean. For seven years he has worked in investigating and formulating public policies about freedom of expression, access to justice, access to public information, official advertisement, and freedom of expression online. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Cristian Vaccari is a reader in politics at Royal Holloway, University of London, and an associate professor in political science at the University of Bologna. He focuses on political communication in a comparative perspective and is the principal investigator of a comparative research project on the role of social media in citizens’ and politicians’ practices of political communication in Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom. His latest book is Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study. He served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Hilde Van den Bulck is a professor of communication studies and head of the Media, Policy and Culture research group at the University of Antwerp. She combines complementary expertise in media policies and structures with expertise on media cultures. She was vice chair of the Flemish Media Policy Advice Council from 2008 to 2015. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Miriam van der Burg is a PhD student and member of the Media, Policy and Culture research group at the University of Antwerp. She is completing a doctoral project on financial structures of the Flemish press. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom of the Press.

 

ADVISERS

Barbara Borst teaches in master’s programs at New York University’s Journalism Institute and the Center for Global Affairs, and has extensive reporting experience from Kenya, South Africa, France, and Canada. Previously, she served as an editor at the international desk of the Associated Press. Her articles have been published by the Associated Press, the Boston Globe, the Dallas Morning News, the Denver Post, Inter Press Service, GlobalPost, and Huffington Post, among others. She received a bachelor’s degree in English from Yale University and a master’s degree in international relations from Boston University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Katherine Brown is a 2016-2017 International Affairs Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and a nonresident senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). She is also an adjunct assistant professor at Georgetown University’s Security Studies Program. From 2013 to 2016, she served as the executive director of the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy at the U.S. Department of State, and previously served in the U.S. government as an assistant to the national security advisor at the White House; as a communications advisor at the American Embassy in Kabul; and as a professional staff member at the Committee on Foreign Affairs at the U.S. House of Representatives. She also worked throughout South Asia as a communications manager for the Asia Foundation. Dr. Brown received her PhD in Communications from Columbia University in 2013, completing her doctoral fieldwork in Afghanistan and Pakistan, where she examined their news media’s effects on governance, civil society and foreign policy. She served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Rosental Calmon Alves holds the Knight Chair in International Journalism in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the founding director of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas. He holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and was the first Brazilian to be awarded a Nieman Fellowship to study at Harvard University. A board member of several national and international organizations, he has been a frequent speaker and trainer as well as a consultant. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Jeffrey Conroy-Krutz is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, where he is also a core faculty member of the African Studies Center. He earned a PhD in political science from Columbia University. His research focuses on Africa, with particular emphasis on electoral decision-making, ethnic politics, and the media. His work has appeared in a number of peer-reviewed journals, including African Affairs, the British Journal of Political ScienceComparative Political StudiesElectoral Studies, the Journal of Modern African Studies, the Journal of Politics, and Political Research Quarterly, as well as in several edited volumes. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

John Dinges is the Godfrey Lowell Cabot Professor of Journalism Emeritus at Columbia University and a former correspondent in Latin America. He was awarded the Maria Moors Cabot gold medal in 1992. His books include The Condor Years: How Pinochet and His Allies Brought Terrorism to Three ContinentsAssassination on Embassy Row (with Saul Landau); and Our Man in Panama: The Shrewd Rise and Brutal Fall of Manuel Noriega. He was an assistant editor for the foreign desk of the Washington Post; deputy foreign editor, managing editor, and editorial director of NPR News; and was cofounder and director of the Centro de Investigación e Información Periodística (CIPERChile.cl). He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Ashley Esarey teaches political science at the University of Alberta, where he also serves as academic adviser of the China Institute. His research focuses on Chinese domestic politics and international relations, political communication and digital media, and environmentalism in East Asia. He received a PhD in political science from Columbia University and held the An Wang Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. He served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Jeffrey Ghannam is an attorney and media professional who has contributed widely to the analysis and debate about the role of digital media leading up to and following civil movements in the Arab world, including a two-part report for the National Endowment for Democracy’s Center for International Media Assistance. He has written separately on the subject for the Economist and the Washington Post. He received a Knight International Journalism Fellowship to develop programs in the Middle East and North Africa, where he has also served as a media development trainer and adviser. He previously worked at the Detroit Free Press and the New York Times. He served as a Middle East and North Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Robert Lane Greene is the deputy editor for books and arts at the Economist in London, and a former adjunct assistant professor of global affairs at New York University. He holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations and history from Tulane University and a master’s degree in European politics from Oxford University, where he was a Marshall Scholar. He served as a Europe adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Daniel C. Hallin is a professor of communications at the University of California, San Diego. His books include The “Uncensored War”: The Media and VietnamWe Keep America on Top of the World: Television Journalism and the Public Sphere; and, with Paolo Mancini, Comparing Media Systems: Three Models of Media and Politics and Comparing Media Systems Beyond the Western World. He has also written on media and politics in Mexico and on media and political clientelism in Latin America. He served as an Americas adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Sallie Hughes is a journalism studies professor and researcher with a specialization in Latin America, the Caribbean, and their diasporas. She is the faculty lead for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Miami Institute for Advance Study of the Americas (UMIA). Her current work focuses on how violence in insecure democratic contexts affects journalistic practice. She is also the coauthor of the book Making a Life in Multi-Ethnic Miami: Immigration and the Rise of a Global City and author of Newsrooms in Conflict: Journalism and the Democratization of Mexico. She also serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Press/Politics. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the Department of Journalism and Media Management and the Latin American Studies Program at the University of Miami. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Karin Karlekar is the director of Free Expression Programs at PEN America. Prior to joining PEN, she served as director of the Freedom of the Press project. As well as acting as an expert spokesperson on press freedom issues, she has developed index methodologies and conducted training sessions on press freedom, internet freedom, freedom of expression, and monitoring of dangerous speech; authored a number of special reports and academic papers; and conducted research, assessment, and advocacy missions to Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Afghanistan, Indonesia, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. She has also worked as an editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit and as a consultant to Human Rights Watch, and served as chair of the governing council of the International Freedom of Expression Exchange (IFEX) network. She holds a PhD in Indian history from Cambridge University and a bachelor’s degree from Vassar College. She served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Alisher Khamidov specializes in ethnic relations, religious activism, social movements, political economy, and inter-state relations in Central Asia and Eurasia. He is currently a visiting researcher at Newcastle University, in the United Kingdom. From 1998 to 2001, he served as Director of the Osh Media Resource Center (OMRC), a nonprofit independent media association in southern Kyrgyzstan. He has also acted as a consultant for the Central Eurasia Project of the New York-based Open Society Institute (Soros Foundation). From 2012 to 2014, Khamidov was a British Academy and Royal Society-sponsored Newton International Fellow at Newcastle University. He has previously worked as lecturer and researcher at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University, Notre Dame University’s Sanctions and Security Project, the NEH Summer Institute on Eurasian Civilizations at Harvard University, and at the Foreign Policy Studies Program of the Brookings Institution. Khamidov has a bachelor’s degree in teaching English and German from Osh State University, a master’s degree in international peace studies from the Joan B. Kroc Institute of International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame, and a PhD in international relations, Johns Hopkins University. He served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom of the Press.

Noha Mellor is a professor of media at the University of Bedfordshire in the United Kingdom and adjunct professor of Middle Eastern Studies at Stockholm University in Sweden. She is the author of nine books about Arab media and culture, of which the most recent is Voice of the Muslim Brotherhood. Mellor is a Fellow of Higher Education Academy in the UK, a board member of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) and associate editor of the British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies. She served as a Middle East and North Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Folu Ogundimu is a professor in the School of Journalism and the College of Communication Arts and Sciences at Michigan State University, East Lansing. He is coeditor of Media and Democracy in Africa, and has also worked as a senior research associate for Afrobarometer and the Center for Democracy and Development, Ghana; a research associate for the Globalization Research Center on Africa, UCLA; and a visiting professor at the University of Lagos, Nigeria and Sichuan University, Chengdu, China. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Robert Orttung is assistant director of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, president of the Resource Security Institute, and a visiting scholar at the Center for Security Studies at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. He is managing editor of Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization and a coeditor of the Russian Analytical Digest and the Caucasus Analytical Digest. He received a PhD in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles. He served as a Eurasia adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Zrinjka Peruško is a professor of media sociology and communication at the Faculty of Political Science, University of Zagreb, and founder and chair of its Centre for Media and Communication Research. She is a comparative communications scholar focusing on media systems and democratic media reform in Central and Eastern Europe, and a founding codirector of the international graduate spring school on comparative media systems. She serves as the chair of the CEE Network of the European Communication Research and Education Association (ECREA), and was the chair of the group of experts on media diversity at the Council of Europe. In addition to five authored and coedited books in Croatian, her book chapters and articles appear internationally. She served as a Europe adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Maria Šajkaš is a U.S. correspondent for a Serbian weekly Novi Magazin and the founder of a media analysis consultancy 4 Better Media. She has 25 years of experience working as a reporter, editor, and media consultant. Some of her most recent writings include guest blogger posts for the Committee to Protect Journalists and the Center for International Media Assistance. She served as a Europe adviser for Freedom of the Press

Peter Von Doepp is an associate professor of political science at the University of Vermont. His research focuses on African politics with specific attention to democratization issues. His most recent book, Judicial Politics in New Democracies: Cases from Southern Africa, examines judicial development in new Southern African democracies. His other published work appears in a variety of peer-reviewed journals and several edited volumes. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Fulbright-Hays program. He received his PhD from the University of Florida. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa adviser for Freedom of the Press.

Meredith L. Weiss is a professor of political science at the University at Albany, SUNY. She has published widely on political mobilization and contention, the politics of identity and development, and electoral politics in Southeast Asia. Her books include Student Activism in Malaysia: Crucible, Mirror, Sideshow and Protest and Possibilities: Civil Society and Coalitions for Political Change in Malaysia, as well as eight edited volumes, including the forthcoming Political Participation in Asia: Defining and Deploying Political Space. She served as an Asia-Pacific adviser for Freedom of the Press.