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Contributing Authors

Michael E. Allison is an associate professor of political science at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania. He received his master’s degree and PhD in political science from Florida State University. His teaching and research interests include the comparative study of civil war and civil war resolution, particularly as it relates to the transition of former armed opposition groups to political parties in Latin America. His work has appeared in Latin American Politics and Society, Conflict Management and Peace Science, and Studies in Comparative International Development. He also blogs at Central American Politics. He served as a Central America analyst for Freedom in the World.

Roop Bhatti is a juris doctor candidate at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Law. Previously, she worked as a legal intern at the Human Rights Law Network in New Delhi, India. She also interned at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and was a foreign language interpreter for several South Asian languages in the Circuit Court of Cook County. She holds a bachelor’s degree with honors in both international studies and South Asian languages and civilization from the University of Chicago. She served as a South Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jaclyn Burger is a peace-building consultant based in South Africa. She previously served with the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti and the United Nations Mission in Liberia. She has also worked on bilateral security-sector reform and training programs in Liberia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Her research interests include security-sector reform, transitional justice, national reconciliation, and governance issues in sub-Saharan Africa. She holds a master’s degree in international peace and conflict resolution with a specialization in postconflict peace building from American University. She served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

S. Adam Cardais is a contributing editor at Transitions Online, a Prague-based internet magazine covering politics, economics, and society in postcommunist Europe and the former Soviet Union. He holds an MA in European studies, with a focus on postconflict peace building in the former Yugoslavia, from New York University. He served as a Balkans analyst for Freedom in the World.

Fotini Christia is an associate professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her book, Alliance Formation in Civil War, is forthcoming in 2012 from Cambridge University Press. She has done extensive ethnographic, survey, and experimental research in the field, addressing the effects of institutions of cooperation in postconflict, multiethnic societies. Her current collaborative research project is a randomized impact evaluation of a $1 billion community-driven development program in Afghanistan, which examines the effects of development aid on local governance and economic well-being. She served as a South Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Catherine Conaghan is a professor of political studies at Queen’s University, Canada, where she focuses on the Andean region. She is the author of several books on topics dealing with democracy in Latin America, including Fujimori’s Peru: Deception in the Public Sphere. Her publications include articles in the Journal of Latin American Studies, Latin American Research Review, and Studies in Comparative International Development. She has conducted extensive fieldwork in Ecuador, Bolivia, and Peru. She received a PhD from Yale University. She served as an Andean region analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sarah Cook is a senior research analyst at Freedom House. She serves as assistant editor for Freedom on the Net, an index that tracks internet freedom around the world, and is an editor of the China Media Bulletin, a weekly news digest of media freedom developments related to China. She coedited the English version of Chinese attorney Gao Zhisheng’s memoir, A China More Just, and was a delegate to the UN Human Rights Commission for an organization working on religious freedom in China. She holds a master’s degree in politics and an LLM in public international law from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, where she was a Marshall Scholar. She served as an East Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Britta H. Crandall teaches at Davidson College in North Carolina. She completed her PhD at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies and is the author of Hemispheric Giants: The Misunderstood History of U.S.-Brazilian Relations. Prior to her doctoral studies, she was associate director for Latin American sovereign risk analysis at Bank One and worked as a Latin American program examiner for the Office of Management and Budget. She served as a South America analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jake Dizard is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of Texas at Austin. He was previously the managing editor of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. His area of focus is Latin America, with a specific emphasis on the Andean region and Mexico. He is a 2005 graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as a Latin America analyst for Freedom in the World.

Richard Downie is deputy director and a fellow of the Africa program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Previously, he was a journalist for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). He received a master’s degree in international public policy at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as a Horn of Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jennifer Dunham is a research analyst for Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press at Freedom House. Previously, she was the managing editor and Africa writer for Facts On File World News Digest. She holds a master’s degree in international relations from New York University’s Center for Global Affairs, where she wrote her thesis on transitional justice in Rwanda and Sierra Leone. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Michael Dzubian is a student at Harvard Law School. From 2009 to 2012, he worked as a research assistant in the Middle East Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom in the World.

David Fowkes is an adjunct professor at American University and Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. He holds a PhD from the latter, attained with the support of a Fulbright scholarship. He served as a Southern and East Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Amy Freedman is a professor and the department chair of political science and international studies at Long Island University, C. W. Post Campus. She received her master’s degree and PhD in political science from New York University. Her research touches on various questions relating to democratization. She has a forthcoming book on the internationalization of domestic conflicts and is a coeditor of the journal Asian Security. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Carol Jean Gallo is a PhD student in the Politics and International Studies Department at the University of Cambridge, and holds a master’s degree in African studies from Yale University. Her research is concerned with local knowledge and the ways in which international institutions and local people may understand concepts related to peace building. Previously, she worked as a consultant in the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations in New York. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Natasha Geber is a New York–based independent researcher. She previously contributed to Freedom House’s Nations in Transit publication. She holds a BA in political science and Slavic studies from McGill University, where she has also worked as a researcher in the Political Science Department. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Thomas W. Gold is currently the director of strategic initiatives and external affairs at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools at New York University. He is a former assistant professor of comparative politics at Sacred Heart University and the author of The Lega Nord and Contemporary Politics in Italy. He earned his PhD in political science from the New School for Social Research and received a Fulbright Fellowship to conduct research in Italy. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Eva Hoier Greene is a former research assistant at Freedom House. She completed her bachelor’s degree in international development in Denmark. Prior to her work at Freedom House, she covered nuclear disarmament, among other issues, at the Permanent Mission of Denmark to the United Nations. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Arman Grigoryan is an assistant professor of international relations at Lehigh University. His research interests revolve around interstate and intrastate conflicts, interventions, and post-Soviet politics. His articles have appeared in International Studies Quarterly, International Security, and Ethnopolitics. He served as a Caucasus analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sylvana Habdank-Kołaczkowska is the project director of Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia. She also writes reports on Central Europe for the Freedom of the Press survey. Previously, she was the managing editor of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a peer-reviewed quarterly. She holds an MA from Harvard University in regional studies of Eastern Europe and Eurasia, and a BA in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. She served as a Central Europe and Balkans analyst for Freedom in the World.

Holger Henke is assistant provost at York College (CUNY) and a political scientist with a variety of research interests in international relations. He has authored and edited six books, including Constructing Vernacular Culture in the Trans-Caribbean, and has published numerous articles in journals such as Cultural Critique and Latin American Perspectives. He is the editor of Wadabagei: A Journal of the Caribbean and its Diasporas. He received a PhD in government from the University of the West Indies (Mona) and a master’s degree in political science from the Geschwister-Scholl-Institute of Political Science at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich. He served as a Caribbean analyst for Freedom in the World.

Anne Henochowicz is the translation coordinator for the bilingual website China Digital Times. She has contributed to Foreign Policy and the blog China Beat. She received master’s degrees from the University of Cambridge and Ohio State University, where she studied Mongolian folk music in contemporary China. She served as an East Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Daniel Holodnik is the Middle East program coordinator and research associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He holds a master’s degree in Islamic studies from Duke University and a bachelor’s degree in religion from Cornell University. He served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom in the World.

Maïté Hostetter is a program coordinator for the West Africa Department at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems, where she focuses on human rights, civic and voter education, and electoral management. Previously, she worked at Freedom House in the West and Central Africa Department. She holds a master’s degree in the social sciences from the University of Chicago with a concentration on human rights, and a bachelor’s degree in international studies and anthropology from the University of California, San Diego. She served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Rachel Jacobs is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research focuses on regime consolidation in Southeast Asia. Previously, she was a research analyst for Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. She holds a master’s degree in international relations from the University of Chicago and a bachelor’s degree in government and Asian studies from Cornell University. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Toby Craig Jones is an associate professor of history and the director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. From 2012 to 2014, he will serve as co-director of the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis. He is also a nonresident scholar in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He is the author of Desert Kingdom: How Oil and Water Forged Modern Saudi Arabia and is currently writing a new book entitled America’s Oil Wars. He is an editor of Middle East Report and has published widely, including in the International Journal of Middle East Studies, the Atlantic, the New York Times, and Foreign Affairs. From 2004 to 2006 he was the Persian Gulf analyst at the International Crisis Group. He served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom in the World.

Karin Deutsch Karlekar is the project director of Freedom of the Press, Freedom House’s annual survey of global press freedom. A specialist on media freedom trends and measurement indicators, she also developed the methodology for and edited the pilot edition of Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s assessment of internet and digital media freedom. She has written South Asia reports for several Freedom House publications, and has been on research and advocacy missions to Afghanistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. She previously worked as a consultant for Human Rights Watch and as an editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit. She holds a PhD in Indian history from Cambridge University. She served as a South Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sanja Kelly is the project director of Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s assessment of internet and digital media freedom. An expert on internet freedom, democratic governance, and women’s rights, she has also directed the research and production of Freedom House publications including Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa and Countries at the Crossroads. She is the author of numerous reports and articles on these topics, and has been on research assignments in the former Yugoslavia, the Caucasus, South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. She served as a Balkans analyst for Freedom in the World.

Joshua Kurlantzick is a fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, he was a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he focused on Southeast Asian politics and economics and China’s relations with Southeast Asia. He is a longtime journalist whose articles have appeared in Time, the New Republic, the Atlantic Monthly, Foreign Affairs, and the New Yorker, among others. He is the author of the upcoming book Democracy in Decline. He served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Miriam Lanskoy is the director for Russia and Eurasia at the National Endowment for Democracy. She has testified before Congress, been interviewed on NPR, and appeared on PBS’s Newshour, in addition to publishing articles in periodicals including the Journal of Democracy, SAIS Review, and Fletcher Forum. In 2010, she published her first book, The Chechen Struggle: Independence Won and Lost, with former foreign minister of Chechnya Ilyas Akhmadov. She holds a PhD in international affairs from Boston University. She served as a Central Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Astrid Larson is the language center coordinator for the French Institute Alliance Française. She has served as an analyst for Western Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and the South Pacific for Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press survey. She received her MA in international media and culture from the New School University. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Peter Licursi is an editor at Bidoun, a magazine that deals with art, culture, and politics in the Middle East. He studied history at Columbia University and Turkish at Yeditepe University in Istanbul. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Timothy Longman is an associate professor of political science and director of the African Studies Center at Boston University. He has researched and published extensively on state-society relations, human rights, religion, and politics in Burundi, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of Congo, and authored the book Christianity and Genocide in Rwanda. Prior to coming to Boston University, he taught for 13 years at Vassar College. He has served as a consultant for Human Rights Watch, the International Center for Transitional Justice, and USAID in Burundi, Rwanda, and Congo. He served as an East Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Eleanor Marchant is a PhD candidate at the Annenberg School for Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in political communications and new technology in Africa. She is also a research associate at the Center for Global Communication Studies, where she advises on African and transnational media research projects. Previously, she worked at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford, the Media Development Loan Fund, and the Media Institute in Nairobi. She also served as assistant editor for Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press survey. She holds a master’s degree in international relations from New York University. She served as a West Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Katherin Machalek is a research analyst for Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia. A specialist on Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia, she has authored several articles on political developments and corruption. Previously, she worked for the Geneva-based Human Rights Information and Documentation Systems (HURIDOCS), helping civil society organizations in Eurasia improve their use of information and communication technologies and digital advocacy. She holds a master’s degree in political science from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She served as a Central Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Susana Moreira is a PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, where her research focuses on Chinese national oil companies’ investment strategies in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. She is also involved in several other research projects, including the African Crisis Management in Comparative Perspective project sponsored by Africom. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Bret Nelson is a senior research assistant for Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press at Freedom House. He holds a master’s degree in political science from Fordham University and is completing a master’s degree in Middle East studies at the Graduate Center, CUNY. He served as a Caribbean analyst for Freedom in the World.

Alysson A. Oakley is a senior adviser at the International Republican Institute. She has lived in Indonesia (with frequent postings to East Timor) for over ten years, five of which were spent working on political development with a focus on political parties and local legislatures. She holds a master’s degree in international economics and Southeast Asian studies from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Robert Orttung is assistant director of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, president of the Resource Security Institute, and a visiting scholar at the Center for Security Studies at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. He is managing editor of Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization and a coeditor of the Russian Analytical Digest and the Caucasus Analytical Digest. He received his PhD in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Francois Pierre-Louis is an associate professor of political science at Queens College, CUNY, and a senior adviser to the chancellor of the City University of New York for the Haiti-CUNY Program. His research interests include immigration and Haitian and Caribbean politics. He served in the private cabinets of President Jean Bertrand Aristide of Haiti in 1991 and Prime Minister Jacques Edouard Alexis in 2007–2008. He is the author of Haitians in New York City: Transnationalism and Hometown Associations. His articles have appeared in Wadabagei: A Journal of the Caribbean and its Diasporas, the Journal of Haitian Studies, and the Journal of Black Studies. He served as a Caribbean analyst for Freedom in the World.

Arch Puddington is vice president for research at Freedom House and coeditor of Freedom in the World. He has written widely on American foreign policy, race relations, organized labor, and the history of the Cold War. He is the author of Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty and Lane Kirkland: Champion of American Labor. He served as a North America analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sarah Repucci is an independent consultant based in New York City. She has previously worked as a senior research coordinator at Transparency International and a senior researcher at Freedom House. She holds a master’s degree in European studies from New York University. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Mark Y. Rosenberg is the Southern Africa analyst for Eurasia Group. He received a PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, where his research focused on single-party dominance and the political economy of heterogeneous societies, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. He previously worked as a researcher at Freedom House and assistant editor of Freedom in the World. He served as a Southern Africa and Middle East analyst for Freedom in the World.

Tyler Roylance is a staff editor at Freedom House and is involved in a number of its publications. Previously, he worked as a senior editor for Facts On File World News Digest. He holds a master’s degree in history from New York University. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Clement V. Salomon holds a master’s degree in politics from New York University, where he focused on European security and defense policy. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Yvonne Shen is an editor for the China Media Bulletin, Freedom House’s weekly digest of media freedom developments related to China. Prior to joining Freedom House, she was a research fellow at the Taiwan Foundation for Democracy in Taipei. She holds a master’s degree from New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service. She served as an East Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Silvana Toska is a PhD candidate in political science at Cornell University, focusing on the causes and spread of revolutions. She received a master’s degree in African studies from Oxford University, where she wrote on the effects of foreign aid on ethnic conflict, and a master’s degree in Arab studies from Georgetown University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jenny Town is a research associate at the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. Previously, she worked for the Human Rights in North Korea Project at Freedom House. She holds a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, with a concentration in human rights. She served as an East Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Noah Tucker holds a master’s degree from Harvard University’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, and has worked both in the nonprofit sector and as a researcher on Central Asian religion, human rights, security, and conflict. He served as a U.S. embassy policy specialist for Kyrgyzstan in 2011 and returned to Central Asia for fieldwork most recently in the summer of 2012. He served as a Central Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Vanessa Tucker is the director for analysis at Freedom House. Previously, she was the project director of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. Prior to joining Freedom House, she worked at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program, at the Kennedy School’s Program on Intrastate Conflict, and with the Carter Center’s Democracy Program. She holds a master’s degree in international relations from Yale University. She served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom in the World.

Ali Vaez is the director of the Iran Project at the Federation of American Scientists. Trained as a scientist, he has more than a decade of experience in journalism, including as a foreign correspondent for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty in Switzerland. He has written widely on Iranian affairs and is a regular contributor to media outlets such as the BBC, CNN, NPR, and Reuters. His work has appeared in the International Herald Tribune, Foreign Policy, the Huffington Post, and the Atlantic, among others. He received a PhD from the University of Geneva and a master’s degree in international public policy from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. He served as a Middle East analyst for Freedom in the World.

Daria Vaisman is a New York–based writer and producer. Her first book, a narrative nonfiction account of U.S. foreign policy in the former Soviet Union, will be published in 2013. She is also making a documentary on diplomatic recognition and sovereignty, which is currently in production. She holds a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. She served as a Caucasus analyst for Freedom in the World.

Christine Wade is an associate professor of political science and international studies at Washington College, where she is also the curator of the Louis L. Goldstein Program in Public Affairs. She has authored and coauthored numerous publications on Central American politics, and holds a PhD in political science from Boston University. She served as a Central America analyst for Freedom in the World.

Christopher Walker was vice president for strategy and analysis at Freedom House through mid-2012. He served as coeditor of Countries at the Crossroads and Nations in Transit and has written extensively on issues of democratic development. He holds a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. He served as a Caucasus analyst for Freedom in the World.

Greg White is a professor of government and the faculty director of the Global Studies Center at Smith College. He is the author of Climate Change and Migration: Borders and Security in a Warming World and a recipient of a Mellon Foundation New Directions Fellowship, as well as Fulbright-IIE and Fulbright-Hays scholarships to Tunisia and Morocco, respectively. He received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He served as a North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Aimel Rios Wong is as assistant program officer at the National Endowment for Democracy, where he assists in the evaluation of project proposals and monitors the work of grantees in Cuba, Paraguay, Peru, and Venezuela. He received a master’s degree in international affairs, with a concentration in Latin America and the Caribbean, from American University. He served as a Caribbean analyst for Freedom in the World.

Anny Wong is a political scientist with the RAND Corporation. Her research covers science and technology policy, international development, army manpower, and U.S. relations with states in the Asia-Pacific region. She holds a PhD in political science from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She served as a Pacific Islands analyst for Freedom in the World.

Eliza B. Young is the Watchlist analyst for the International Rescue Committee’s Emergency Preparedness and Response Unit in New York City. She previously worked as a research analyst at Freedom House. She holds a master’s degree in international relations from King’s College, London. She served as a Central and Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.


Academic Advisers

Jon B. Alterman is the Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and director of the Middle East Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.        

Gordon Bardos is a Balkan politics and security expert based in New York City.

Javier Corrales is a professor of political science at Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts.

Robert Lane Greene writes for the Economist and is an adjunct assistant professor of global affairs at New York University.

Steven Heydemann is the senior adviser for Middle East initiatives at the U.S. Institute of Peace, and previously served as director of the Center for Democracy and Civil Society at Georgetown University.

David Holiday is the senior regional advocacy officer for the Latin America Program of the Open Society Foundations.

Thomas R. Lansner is an adjunct associate professor of international affairs at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

Carl LeVan is an assistant professor at American University’s School of International Service in Washington, DC.

Peter Lewis is an associate professor and director of the African Studies Program at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies.

Ellen Lust is an associate professor of political science at Yale University.

Rajan Menon is the Anne and Bernard Spitzer Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science, City College of New York/City University of New York.

John S. Micgiel is an adjunct professor of international affairs and executive director of the East Central European Center at Columbia University.

Alexander J. Motyl is a professor of political science at Rutgers University, Newark.

Andrew J. Nathan is the Class of 1919 Professor of Political Science at Columbia University.

Philip Oldenburg is an adjunct associate professor in Columbia University’s Department of Political Science and a research scholar at the university’s South Asia Institute.

Martin Schain is a professor of politics at New York University.

Peter Sinnott is an independent scholar who has been working on Central Asia issues for more than 25 years.

Scott Taylor is an associate professor in the School of Foreign Service and director of the African Studies Program at Georgetown University.

Bridget Welsh is an associate professor of political science at Singapore Management University.

Coletta A. Youngers is an independent consultant specializing in human rights and democracy issues in Latin America and a senior fellow at the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA).
 

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