Survey Team

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Contributing Authors

Michael E. Allison is an associate professor of political science at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania. He received his master’s degree and PhD in political science from Florida State University. His teaching and research interests include the comparative study of civil war and civil war resolution, particularly as it relates to the transformation of armed opposition groups into political parties in Latin America. His work has appeared in Latin American Politics and Society, Conflict Management and Peace Science, and Studies in Comparative International Development. He also blogs at Central American Politics. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

David Baker is an analyst and consultant for the U.S. Department of Defense and its Africa Command. He has researched and worked on sustainable development and conflict analysis in Africa and elsewhere for 15 years. He received a master’s degree in cultural anthropology from Indiana University, Bloomington, with a concentration in African studies. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Carolyn Barnett is a research fellow in the Middle East Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Her primary research interests are in the politics and society of North Africa. She also supports the Middle East Program’s projects related to the Persian Gulf. She received master’s degrees in Middle East politics and Islamic studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, where she was a Marshall Scholar. She spent a year as a graduate fellow in the Center for Arabic Study Abroad program at the American University in Cairo on a Fulbright scholarship. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Robert Blair is a PhD candidate in political science at Yale University. His research focuses on the dynamics of, and potential tradeoffs between, peacekeeping and state building in war-torn countries. He recently served as co-principal investigator on an evaluation of a large-scale alternative dispute resolution program in Liberia; an article based on that research is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review. Previously, he worked as a consultant for the Small Arms Survey and the UN Office of Rule of Law Security Institutions, among others. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

S. Adam Cardais is a contributing editor at Transitions Online, a Prague-based internet magazine covering politics, economics, and society in postcommunist Europe and the former Soviet Union. He received a master’s degree in European studies, with a focus on postconflict peace building in the former Yugoslavia, from New York University. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Fotini Christia is an associate professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research interests deal with issues of conflict and cooperation in the Muslim world. She has done extensive ethnographic, survey, and experimental research on the effects of development aid in postconflict, multiethnic societies, with a focus on Afghanistan and Bosnia and Herzegovina. She is the author of Alliance Formation in Civil Wars, awarded the 2013 Gregory M. Luebbert Award for Best Book in Comparative Politics. Her research has also been published in Science and in the American Political Science Review, and she has written opinion pieces for Foreign Affairs, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Boston Globe. She received a PhD in public policy from Harvard University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sarah Cook is a senior research analyst for East Asia at Freedom House. She manages the team that produces the China Media Bulletin, a biweekly news digest of press freedom developments related to China. She previously served as assistant editor on three editions of Freedom House’s Freedom on the Net index, which assesses internet and digital media freedom around the world. She coedited the English version of Chinese attorney Gao Zhisheng’s memoir, A China More Just, and was a delegate to the UN Human Rights Commission for an organization working on religious freedom in China. She received a master’s degree in politics and a master of laws degree in public international law from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, where she was a Marshall Scholar. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Britta H. Crandall is an adjunct professor at Davidson College in North Carolina. She is the author of Hemispheric Giants: The Misunderstood History of U.S.-Brazilian Relations. Previously, she was associate director for Latin American sovereign risk analysis at Bank One and worked as a Latin American program examiner for the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. She received a PhD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Julian Dierkes is an associate professor and the Keidanren Chair in Japanese Research at the University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research, where he coordinates the Program on Inner Asia. His research has focused on history education and supplementary education in Japan, as well as contemporary Mongolia. He is the editor of Change in Democratic Mongolia: Social Relations, Health, Mobile Pastoralism, and Mining. He received a PhD in sociology from Princeton University. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jake Dizard is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of Texas at Austin. He was previously the managing editor of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. His area of focus is Latin America, with a specific emphasis on the Andean region and Mexico. He received a master’s degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Richard Downie is deputy director and a fellow of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Previously, he was a journalist for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). He received a master’s degree in international public policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jennifer Dunham is a senior research analyst for Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press at Freedom House. Previously, she was the managing editor and Africa writer for Facts On File World News Digest. She received a master’s degree in international relations from New York University, where she wrote her thesis on transitional justice in Rwanda and Sierra Leone. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Nicholas Farrelly is a research fellow at the Australian National University’s College of Asia and the Pacific. His academic interests are focused on the long-term study of Southeast Asian societies and politics. Since 2011, he has convened the university’s undergraduate program in peace, conflict, and war studies. In 2012, he received an Australian Research Council fellowship for a three-year study of Burma’s political cultures “in transition.” He received a master’s degree and PhD from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Amy Freedman is a professor and the department chair of political science and international studies at Long Island University, C. W. Post Campus. Her research touches on various questions relating to democratization. She has a forthcoming book on the internationalization of domestic conflicts and is a coeditor of the journal Asian Security. She received a master’s degree and PhD in political science from New York University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Thomas W. Gold is the director of strategic initiatives and external affairs at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools at New York University. He is a former assistant professor of comparative politics at Sacred Heart University and the author of The Lega Nord and Contemporary Politics in Italy. He received a PhD in political science from the New School for Social Research and a Fulbright Fellowship to conduct research in Italy. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Eva Hoier Greene is a former research assistant at Freedom House. Previously, she covered nuclear disarmament, among other issues, at the Permanent Mission of Denmark to the United Nations. She received a bachelor’s degree in international development in Denmark. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Nicole Greene is a program associate with the Global Freedom of Expression Campaign at Freedom House. She received a master’s degree in international relations from New York University’s Center for Global Affairs, where she wrote her thesis on international attention and response in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Sudan. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Shelby Grossman is a PhD candidate in government at Harvard University, focusing on the politics of informal trade in Nigeria. She has separate research projects on the politics of diversified business groups and on the determinants of illegal price discrimination in developing countries. She has research experience throughout Nigeria, and also in Liberia, Equatorial Guinea, and Cameroon. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Holger Henke is assistant provost at York College, City University of New York, and a political scientist with a variety of research interests in international relations. He has authored and edited six books, including Constructing Vernacular Culture in the Trans-Caribbean, and has published numerous articles in journals such as Cultural Critique and Latin American Perspectives. He is the editor of Wadabagei: A Journal of the Caribbean and its Diasporas. He received a master’s degree in political science from the Geschwister-Scholl-Institute of Political Science at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich and a PhD in government from the University of the West Indies at Mona, Jamaica. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Ted Henken is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Baruch College, City University of New York. He is a former chair of Baruch’s Black and Latino Studies Department, where he holds a joint appointment. He is the current president of the Association for the Study of the Cuban Economy. He is the author of Cuba: A Global Studies Handbook and is coauthoring a book on the development of self-employment, microenterprise, and the underground economy in Cuba. He has published articles in journals including Nueva Sociedad, Cuban Studies, and Latin American Research Review. He writes about contemporary Cuba in his blog, El Yuma, and is frequently interviewed by major media outlets, including CNN, the New York Times, the BBC, and Univision. He received a PhD in Latin American studies from Tulane University. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Franklin Hess is the coordinator of the Modern Greek Program at Indiana University, a senior lecturer in West European studies, and codirector of a working group on the sovereign debt crisis. His scholarly work examines 20th- and 21st-century Greek popular culture, exploring the economic, geopolitical, and geocultural contexts of its production. He has published on topics including the role of popular culture in modern Greek studies, and his other scholarly interests include immigration and the cinematic representation of violence. He served as the secretary of the Modern Greek Studies Association from 2007 to 2009. He received a PhD in American studies from the University of Iowa, focusing on the influence of American television programming on Greek culture. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Dan Holodnik is assistant general manager at Almona Inc., a Cairo-based firm facilitating new U.S. corporate investment in Egypt and the broader Middle East through in-country representation, marketing, and procurement support. Previously, he was a Middle East research associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He received a master’s degree in Islamic studies from Duke University. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Maïté Hostetter is the program officer for West and Central Africa at Freedom House, where she focuses on human rights, transitional justice, and civil society engagement in the promotion of good governance and democratic reform. Previously, she worked as a West Africa program coordinator at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems. She received a master’s degree in the social sciences from the University of Chicago with a concentration on human rights. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Morgan Huston is a member of the research team at Freedom House, where she also contributes to the Freedom of the Press publication. She received a master’s degree in international human rights from the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Rachel Jacobs is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research focuses on regime consolidation in Southeast Asia. Previously, she was a research analyst for Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. She received a master’s degree in international relations from the University of Chicago. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Toby Craig Jones is an associate professor of history and the director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. From 2012 to 2014, he will serve as codirector of the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis. He is also a nonresident scholar in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Previously, he was the Persian Gulf analyst at the International Crisis Group. He is the author of Desert Kingdom: How Oil and Water Forged Modern Saudi Arabia and is currently writing a book entitled America’s Oil Wars. He is an editor of Middle East Report and has published widely, including in the International Journal of Middle East Studies, the New York Times, and Foreign Affairs. He received a PhD from Stanford University. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Karin Deutsch Karlekar is the project director of Freedom of the Press, Freedom House’s annual survey of global press freedom. A specialist on media freedom trends and measurement indicators, she also developed the methodology for and edited the pilot edition of Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s assessment of internet and digital media freedom. She has written South Asia reports for several Freedom House publications, and has been on research and advocacy missions to Afghanistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. She previously worked as a consultant for Human Rights Watch and as an editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit. She received a PhD in Indian history from Cambridge University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sanja Kelly is the project director of Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s assessment of internet and digital media freedom. An expert on internet freedom, democratic governance, and women’s rights, she has also directed the research and production of Freedom House publications including Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa and Countries at the Crossroads. She is the author of numerous reports and articles on these topics, and has been on research assignments in the former Yugoslavia, the Caucasus, South and Southeast Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. She received a master’s degree in international relations from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Alexandra Kendall is a manager at Global Health Strategies (GHS), an international consulting company focused on global health issues. Prior to joining GHS, she spent two years at the Congressional Research Service, where she provided analysis on issues related to global health, gender-based violence, and postconflict and disaster reconstruction efforts for members of the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate. She has also worked in the field on programs related to women’s health, HIV/AIDS, sexual violence, human trafficking, and youth education in Cambodia, Haiti, Rwanda, Senegal, and South Africa. She received a master’s degree in international relations from Yale University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sylvana Habdank-Kołaczkowska is the project director of Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance in Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia. She also writes reports on Central Europe for the Freedom of the Press survey. Previously, she was the managing editor of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a peer-reviewed quarterly. She received a master’s degree in Eastern European and Eurasian studies from Harvard University. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Paul Kubicek is a professor of political science and director of the International Studies Program at Oakland University. He is the author of numerous works on postcommunist and Turkish politics, which have appeared in journals including Comparative Politics, Democratization, and Political Science Quarterly. He is currently coeditor of Turkish Studies and is working on a book-length project examining the role of Islam in Muslim-majority democracies. He has taught in Ukraine, Turkey, and Austria, and was a Fulbright scholar in Slovenia. He received a PhD in political science from the University of Michigan. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Joshua Kurlantzick is a fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, he was a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he focused on Southeast Asian politics and economics and China’s relations with Southeast Asia. He is a longtime journalist whose articles have appeared in Time, the New Republic, the Atlantic Monthly, Foreign Affairs, and the New Yorker, among others. He is the author of the recently released book Democracy in Decline. He received a bachelor’s degree in political science from Haverford College. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Astrid Larson is the language center administrative director for the French Institute Alliance Française. She has served as an analyst for Western Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and the South Pacific for Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press survey. She received a master’s degree in international media and culture from the New School University. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Beatrice Lindstrom is a human rights attorney with the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (IJDH) focusing on rule of law and access to justice. Prior to joining IJDH, she worked with the Bureau des Avocats Internationaux in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where her activities included election monitoring, human rights reporting, and managing grassroots participation in the UN Universal Periodic Review. She received a juris doctor degree from New York Uni­ver­sity School of Law, where she was a Root Tilden Kern scholar. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Joshua Lustig is managing editor of Current History, an international affairs journal based in Philadelphia. Previously, he was a senior editor at Facts On File World News Digest, covering Western Europe. He received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Columbia University. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Eleanor Marchant is a PhD student at the Annenberg School for Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in political communications and new technology in Africa. She is also a research associate at the Center for Global Communication Studies, where she advises on African and transnational media research projects. Previously, she worked at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at Oxford University, the Media Development Investment Fund, and the Media Institute in Nairobi. She also served as assistant editor for Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press survey. She received a master’s degree in international relations from New York University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Katherin Machalek is a research analyst for Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia. A specialist on Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia, she has authored several articles on political developments and corruption. Previously, she worked for the Geneva-based Human Rights Information and Documentation Systems (HURIDOCS), helping civil society organizations in Eurasia improve their use of information and communication technologies and digital advocacy. She received a master’s degree in political science from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Susana Moreira is a PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, where her research focuses on Chinese national oil companies’ investment strategies in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. She is involved in several other research projects, including the African Crisis Management in Comparative Perspective project sponsored by the U.S. military’s Africa Command, and also works as a consultant for the World Bank’s Gas, Oil, and Mining Division. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Bret Nelson is a research analyst for Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press at Freedom House. He received master’s degrees in political science from Fordham University and in Middle East studies from the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Alysson A. Oakley is a senior adviser at the International Republican Institute and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University. She has lived in Indonesia, with frequent postings to East Timor, for over 10 years, five of which were spent working on political development with a focus on political parties and local legislatures. She received a master’s degree in international economics and Southeast Asian studies from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Robert Orttung is assistant director of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, president of the Resource Security Institute, and a visiting scholar at the Center for Security Studies at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. He is managing editor of Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization and a coeditor of the Russian Analytical Digest and the Caucasus Analytical Digest. He received a PhD in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Shannon O’Toole is an editor and writer at Facts On File World News Digest, where she covers Eastern Europe, Russia, and the Balkans. She is a contributor to Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press report, as well as to the blog for Steppe, a magazine focused on the culture, history, and people of Central Asia. She received a bachelor’s degree in history and anthropology from the University of Missouri, Columbia. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Tom Perrault is an associate professor in the Geography Department at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. He has published on issues including energy resource conflicts, peasant mobilization, and social justice in Bolivia. In 2012, he was a visiting professor in the History Department at Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia. He received a PhD in geography from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he focused on agrarian change, political mobilization, and identity construction among Quichua of the Alto Napo in Ecuadorian Amazonia. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Arch Puddington is vice president for research at Freedom House and coeditor of Freedom in the World. He has written widely on American foreign policy, race relations, organized labor, and the history of the Cold War. He is the author of Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty and Lane Kirkland: Champion of American Labor. He received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the University of Missouri, Columbia. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Mark Y. Rosenberg is a senior Africa analyst at Eurasia Group, focusing on the Southern Africa region. Previously, he worked as a researcher at Freedom House and assistant editor of Freedom in the World. His opinion articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Jerusalem Post, and Business Day (South Africa), and his research has been cited by publications including the Economist and the Financial Times. He received a master’s degree and a PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Tyler Roylance is a staff editor at Freedom House and is involved in a number of its publications. Previously, he worked as a senior editor for Facts On File World News Digest. He received a master’s degree in history from New York University. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Yvonne Shen is an editor for the China Media Bulletin, Freedom House’s biweekly news digest of press freedom developments related to China. Previously, she was a research fellow at the Taiwan Foundation for Democracy in Taipei. She received a master’s degree from New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Neelanjan Sircar is a PhD candidate in political science at Columbia University. His research interests include Indian political economy and voter behavior. He received a bachelor’s degree in applied mathematics and economics from the University of California, Berkeley. Next year, he will join the Center for the Advanced Study of India at the University of Pennsylvania as a post-doctoral fellow. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Mira Sucharov is an associate professor of political science at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She is the author of The International Self: Psychoanalysis and the Search for Israeli-Palestinian Peace, and has had articles published in International Studies Perspectives, the Journal of International Relations and Development, the International Journal, and the Journal of Political Science Education. She blogs at Haaretz and the Daily Beast’s Open Zion. She received a master’s degree in political science from the University of Toronto and a PhD in government from Georgetown University. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Farha Tahir is program coordinator and research associate for the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Africa Program, where she conducts research related to U.S. strategic priorities throughout the continent. She previously worked for the CSIS Program on Crisis, Conflict, and Cooperation and the CSIS Commission on Smart Power. She also provides economic analysis for Pragnya Group. She cofounded EDGE Project (now Tawi UW), an organization that creates and implements community development projects in Lingira, Uganda. She received a master’s degree in international public affairs from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Leigh Tomppert is an independent researcher in the area of gender, human rights, and development. She currently works with the UN Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women as a program specialist in the Leadership and Governance Section. She previously coedited Freedom House’s Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa publication. She received master’s degrees in comparative and cross-cultural research methods from the University of Sussex and in the social sciences from the University of Chicago. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Silvana Toska is a PhD candidate in political science at Cornell University, focusing on the causes and spread of revolutions. She received master’s degrees in African studies from Oxford University, where she wrote on the effects of foreign aid on ethnic conflict, and in Arab studies from Georgetown University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jenny Town is the assistant director of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. Previously, she worked for the Human Rights in North Korea Project at Freedom House. She received a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, with a concentration in human rights. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Mai Truong is a staff editor and Africa analyst for Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s annual assessment of internet and digital media freedom. Prior to joining Freedom House, her work experiences focused on international development, food security, and women’s rights issues in sub-Saharan Africa. She received a master’s degree in international relations from Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Noah Tucker has worked both in the nonprofit sector and as a researcher on Central Asian religion, human rights, security, and conflict. He served as a U.S. embassy policy specialist for Kyrgyzstan in 2011 and returned to Central Asia for fieldwork most recently in the summer of 2012. He received a master’s degree from Harvard University’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Vanessa Tucker is the director for analysis at Freedom House. Previously, she was the project director of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. Prior to joining Freedom House, she worked at the Harvard University Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program, at the Kennedy School’s Program on Intrastate Conflict, and with the Carter Center’s Democracy Program. She received a master’s degree in international relations from Yale University. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Daria Vaisman is a New York–based writer and producer. Her first book, a narrative nonfiction account of U.S. foreign policy in the former Soviet Union, will be published in 2014. She is also codirector of a documentary film on diplomatic recognition and sovereignty, currently in production. Previously, she was an analyst at Transparency International and deputy director of Eurasia Foundation in Tbilisi, Georgia, and a journalist covering the Caucasus and Central Asia. She received a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and is a PhD student in criminal justice at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Christine Wade is an associate professor of political science and international studies at Washington College, where she is also the curator of the Louis L. Goldstein Program in Public Affairs. She has authored and coauthored numerous publications on Central American politics. She received a PhD in political science from Boston University. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jason Warner is a PhD candidate in African studies and government at Harvard University. He has worked or consulted for the UN Development Programme, the Nigerian Mission to the United Nations, and the U.S. Army. He has published on African affairs in outlets including CNN, the Council on Foreign Relations, and UN Dispatch, as well as various academic journals. He received master’s degrees in government from Harvard University and in African studies from Yale University. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World

Greg White is a professor of government and the faculty director of the Global Studies Center at Smith College. He is the author of Climate Change and Migration: Borders and Security in a Warming World and the recipient of a Mellon Foundation New Directions Fellowship, as well as Fulbright-IIE and Fulbright-Hays scholarships to Tunisia and Morocco, respectively. He received a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Anny Wong is an adjunct political scientist with the RAND Corporation and a research fellow with the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. Her research covers science and technology policy, international development, army manpower, and U.S. relations with states in the Asia-Pacific region. She received a PhD in political science from the University of Hawaii, Manoa. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Eliza B. Young is an analyst for the International Rescue Committee’s Emergency Preparedness and Response Unit in New York City. She previously worked as a research analyst at Freedom House. She received a master’s degree in international relations from King’s College London. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe/Eurasia and Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

 

Academic Advisers

Javier Corrales is a professor of political science at Amherst College.

Robert Lane Greene is a Berlin-based correspondent for the Economist, and a former adjunct assistant professor of global affairs at New York University.

Rob Jenkins is a professor of political science at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, and a human rights research fellow at the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College.

Thomas R. Lansner is visiting professor at the Sciences Po Paris School of International Affairs.

Adrienne LeBas is an assistant professor of government at American University’s School of Public Affairs.

Carl LeVan is an assistant professor at American University’s School of International Service.

Peter Lewis is an associate professor and director of the African Studies Program at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies.

Héctor Lindo-Fuentes is a professor of history at Fordham University.

Ellen Lust is an associate professor of political science at Yale University.

Peter Mandaville is a professor of government and politics and director of the Ali Vural Ak Center for Islamic Studies at George Mason University.

Rajan Menon is the Anne and Bernard Spitzer Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science, City College of New York/City University of New York.

John S. Micgiel is an adjunct professor of international affairs and executive director of the East Central European Center at Columbia University.

Carl Minzner is an associate professor at Fordham Law School.

Alexander J. Motyl is a professor of political science at Rutgers University, Newark.

Tsveta Petrova is a fellow at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University.

Martin Schain is a professor of politics at New York University.

Peter Sinnott is an independent scholar working on Central Asia issues.

Scott Taylor is an associate professor in the School of Foreign Service and director of the African Studies Program at Georgetown University.

Bridget Welsh is an associate professor of political science at Singapore Management University.

Coletta A. Youngers is an independent consultant specializing in human rights and democracy issues in Latin America and a senior fellow at the Washington Office on Latin America.

 

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