Analysts

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Analysts for Freedom in the World

Aalaa Abuzaakouk works on Libya and Tunisia programs at the National Endowment for Democracy. Previously, she was a program officer with Freedom House’s Middle East and North Africa team. She has contributed to Freedom in the World, Freedom of the Press, and Voices in the Street, Freedom House’s special publication on social protests and freedom of assembly. She graduated from Georgetown University with a bachelor’s degree in regional studies and a master’s degree in Arab Studies. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Elen Aghekyan is a senior research associate at Freedom House, and has contributed to its Freedom in the World, Freedom of the Press, and Nations in Transit reports. She holds a bachelor’s degree in government and history from Cornell University, and focuses on governance and human rights in post-Soviet countries. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Michael E. Allison is an associate professor of political science at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania. He received his master’s degree and PhD in political science from Florida State University. His teaching and research interests include the comparative study of civil war and civil war resolution, particularly as it relates to the transformation of armed opposition groups into political parties in Latin America. His work has appeared in Latin American Politics and Society, Conflict Management and Peace Science, and Studies in Comparative International Development. He also blogs at Central American Politics. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

David Angeles is a program officer for Southeast Asia at the National Endowment for Democracy, a private, nonprofit foundation dedicated to the growth and strengthening of democratic institutions around the world. Previously, he worked in Thailand and Burma/Myanmar with various civil society and human rights groups. He received a master’s degree in international affairs from the American University of Paris and a bachelor’s degree in international studies from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he was named a Truman Scholar. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Robert Blair is an assistant professor of political science and international studies at Brown University. His research focuses on peacebuilding and statebuilding after civil war, with an emphasis on rule of law and security institutions. He has conducted fieldwork on these and related topics in Colombia, Liberia, and Cote d’Ivoire, and has worked in various capacities for the UN Office of Rule of Law and Security Institutions, the Political Instability Task Force, and the Small Arms Survey. His work has been published in the American Political Science Review and other venues. He holds a master’s degree and PhD in political science from Yale University, and a bachelor’s degree in education studies and comparative literature from Brown University. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Katherine Blue Carroll is an assistant professor and the director of the program in public policy studies at Vanderbilt University. She received her master’s degree and PhD in politics from the University of Virginia. Her teaching and research interests include the comparative politics of the Middle East, political violence, and the U.S. military. Her work has appeared in Middle East Policy and the Middle East Journal. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Fotini Christia is an associate professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research interests center on conflict and cooperation in the Muslim world. She has done extensive ethnographic, survey, and experimental research on the effects of development aid in postconflict, multiethnic societies, with a focus on Afghanistan and Bosnia and Herzegovina. She is the author of Alliance Formation in Civil Wars, which received the 2013 Gregory M. Luebbert Award for Best Book in Comparative Politics, the Lepgold Prize for Best Book in International Relations, and the Distinguished Book Award of the ethnicity, nationalism, and migration section of the International Studies Association. Her research has also been published in Science and the American Political Science Review, among other journals, and she has written opinion pieces for Foreign Affairs, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Boston Globe. She received a PhD in public policy from Harvard University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sarah Cook is a senior research analyst for East Asia at Freedom House. She manages the team that produces the China Media Bulletin, a biweekly news digest of press freedom developments related to China. She previously served as assistant editor on three editions of Freedom House’s Freedom on the Net index, which assesses internet and digital media freedom around the world. She coedited the English version of Chinese attorney Gao Zhisheng’s memoir, A China More Just, and was a delegate to the UN Human Rights Commission for an organization working on religious freedom in China. She received a master’s degree in politics and a master of laws degree in public international law from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, where she was a Marshall Scholar. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Britta H. Crandall is an adjunct professor at Davidson College in North Carolina. She is the author of Hemispheric Giants: The Misunderstood History of U.S.-Brazilian Relations. Previously, she was associate director for Latin American sovereign risk analysis at Bank One, and worked as a Latin American program examiner for the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. She received a PhD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Zselyke Csaky is a research analyst for Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia. She also writes reports for Freedom of the Press. Prior to joining Freedom House, she worked for the Hungarian and U.S. offices of Amnesty International. She holds master’s degrees in international relations and European studies and in human rights from Central European University. She served as a Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Carolina Curvale holds a PhD in political science from New York University, where she also earned her master’s degree in the same discipline. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science at the University of San Andrés, Argentina. Her main research interests are comparative politics, political economy, and Latin American politics. Her doctoral thesis deals with the relationship between political stability and political participation in 19 Latin American countries since independence, based on an original database and statistical analysis. Her research has been published by Oxford University Press and the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, among others. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Julian Dierkes is an associate professor and the Keidanren Chair in Japanese Research at the University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research, where he coordinates the Program on Inner Asia. His research has focused on history education and supplementary education in Japan, as well as contemporary Mongolia. He is the editor of Change in Democratic Mongolia: Social Relations, Health, Mobile Pastoralism, and Mining. He received a PhD in sociology from Princeton University. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jake Dizard is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of Texas at Austin. He was previously the managing editor of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. His area of focus is Latin America, with a specific emphasis on the Andean region and Mexico. He received a master’s degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Richard Downie is deputy director and a fellow of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Previously, he was a journalist for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). He received a master’s degree in international public policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jennifer Dunham is the project manager for Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press at Freedom House, and writes country reports on Southern and East Africa for both publications. She holds a bachelor’s degree in history-sociology from Columbia University and a master’s degree in international relations from New York University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Golnaz Esfandiari is a senior correspondent with Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and the editor of the popular Persian Letters blog. Esfandiari’s work focuses on political and social developments in Iran, and ties between Iran and the United States. Her work has appeared in and has been cited by major publications, including the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Foreign Policy; she has also contributed to Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press report. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World

Amy Freedman is a professor and the department chair of political science and international studies at Long Island University, C. W. Post Campus. Her research touches on various questions relating to democratization and political economy in Southeast Asia. Her most recent book is The Internationalization of Internal Conflicts, and she is a coeditor of the journal Asian Security. She received a master’s degree and PhD in political science from New York University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

T. R. Goldman is a freelance journalist in Washington, DC, and writes for a variety of national publications. He is a former reporter and editor at Reuters and Agence France-Presse. He received a master’s degree in international public policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Geysha Gonzalez is the program assistant for the Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center at the Atlantic Council, where she works on the Ukraine in Europe Initiative. Prior to joining the Council, Geysha spent two years at Freedom House working in various roles including executive assistant to the president and program assistant for the Freedom of Expression team. She holds a master’s degree in the history of international relations from the London School of Economics, and a bachelor’s degree in international affairs from Marquette University. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Eva Hoier Greene is a former research assistant at Freedom House. Previously, she covered nuclear disarmament and other issues at the Permanent Mission of Denmark to the UN. She received a bachelor’s degree in international development in Denmark. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Holger Henke is vice chancellor for academic affairs at Wenzhou-Kean University, in China, and a political scientist with a variety of research interests in international relations. He has authored and edited six books, including Constructing Vernacular Culture in the Trans-Caribbean, and has published numerous articles in journals such as Cultural Critique and Latin American Perspectives. He is the editor of Wadabagei: A Journal of the Caribbean and its Diasporas. He received a master’s degree in political science from the Geschwister Scholl Institute of Political Science at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, and a PhD in government from the University of the West Indies at Mona, Jamaica. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Ted Henken is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Baruch College, City University of New York. He holds a joint appointment in Baruch’s Black and Latino Studies department. He is a past president of the Association for the Study of the Cuban Economy. He is the coauthor with Archibald Ritter of Entrepreneurial Cuba: The Changing Policy Landscape, coeditor with Miriam Celaya and Dimas Castellanos of Cuba in Focus, and author of Cuba: A Global Studies Handbook. He has published articles about Cuba in the journals Nueva Sociedad, Cuban Studies, Latino Studies, and Latin American Research Review, as well as in the New York Times and the blog of the Committee to Protect Journalists. He writes about contemporary Cuba on his blog, El Yuma. He received a PhD in Latin American studies from Tulane University in 2002. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Franklin Hess is the coordinator of the Modern Greek Program at Indiana University, a senior lecturer at the Institute for European Studies, and codirector of a working group on the sovereign debt crisis. His scholarly work examines Greek popular culture, exploring the economic, geopolitical, and geocultural contexts of its production. His other research interests include immigration and the cinematic representation of violence. He served as the secretary of the Modern Greek Studies Association from 2007 to 2009. He received a PhD in American studies from the University of Iowa, focusing on the influence of American television programming on Greek culture. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Maïté Hostetter is the senior program officer for West and Central Africa at Freedom House, where she focuses on human rights, transitional justice, and civil society engagement in the promotion of good governance and democratic reform. Previously, she worked as a West Africa program coordinator at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems. She received a master’s degree in the social sciences from the University of Chicago with a concentration on human rights. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Rola el-Husseini holds a PhD from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris and is currently a research assistant professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center. She has previously held positions at Texas A&M University and Yale University. Her first book, Pax Syriana: Elite Politics in Postwar Lebanon, was published in 2012. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Morgan Huston is a former member of the research team at Freedom House, where she also contributed to the Freedom of the Press publication. She received a master’s degree in international human rights from the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Faysal Itani is a resident fellow with the Atlantic Council's Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East. Itani is a Middle East analyst who focuses on Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, and Jordan. Before joining the Atlantic Council, Itani worked as a risk analyst advising governments, corporations, and international organizations on political, economic, and security affairs in the region. Itani holds a master’s degree in strategic studies and international economics from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, a certificate in public policy from Georgetown University, and a bachelor’s degree in business from the American University of Beirut. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Rachel Jacobs is a graduate student in comparative politics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is currently interested in postconflict politics and authoritarianism in Southeast Asia. Before coming to Madison, she was a research analyst for Freedom House and assistant editor of Countries at the Crossroads, an annual survey of democratic governance. She holds a master’s degree from the University of Chicago in international relations, and a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in government and Asian studies. She served as a Southeast Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Nino Japaridze is a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy Research Institute’s Project on Democratic Transitions, and teaches at George Washington University. She has also taught at the School of International Service at American University and the Global Affairs department at George Mason University. She brings over 15 years of experience across Eurasia in democracy promotion; strategic communications; political, attitudinal, and behavioral research and analysis; innovative research design; and program management and evaluation. She holds a PhD in politics from Oxford University, a master’s degree in political science from George Washington University, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Wheaton College. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Toby Craig Jones is an associate professor of history and the director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. From 2012 to 2014 he served as codirector of the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis. Previously, he was the Persian Gulf analyst at the International Crisis Group. He is the author of Desert Kingdom: How Oil and Water Forged Modern Saudi Arabia and of Running Dry: Essays on Energy and Environmental Crisis, and is currently writing a book entitled America’s Oil Wars. He is an editor of Middle East Report and has published widely, including in the International Journal of Middle East Studies, the New York Times, and Foreign Affairs. He received a PhD from Stanford University. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Karin Deutsch Karlekar is the project director of Freedom of the Press, Freedom House’s annual survey of global media freedom. A specialist on media freedom trends and measurement indicators, she also developed the methodology for and edited the pilot edition of Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s assessment of internet and digital media freedom. She has written South Asia reports for several Freedom House publications, and has been on research and advocacy missions to Afghanistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. She previously worked as a consultant for Human Rights Watch and as an editor at the Economist Intelligence Unit. She received a PhD in Indian history from Cambridge University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Hanna Samir Kassab is a visiting professor of political science at Northern Michigan University. He is the author of Weak States and International Relations Theory: The Cases of Armenia, St. Kitts and Nevis, Lebanon, and Cambodia, and has published articles on international relations theory, national security, the politics of the far-right and nationalism, acts of political suicide, and foreign policy. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Catherine Kelly is a postdoctoral fellow at Washington University in St. Louis in the Department of International and Area Studies. She received her PhD from Harvard University with a dissertation on the sources and consequences of party proliferation in Africa. Her research and teaching address African politics, political party development, elections, democratization, and Islam in politics. A former Fulbright Scholar and Title VI Foreign Language and Area Studies fellow, her work has appeared in the Journal of Democracy and Electoral Studies, and on the blogs of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Social Science Research Council. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Nicholas Kerr is an assistant professor of comparative politics in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alabama. His research interests include African politics, electoral institutions, electoral integrity, and public opinion. His current research project explores the factors that influence the design of electoral commissions in Africa, and probes how the design and performance of these institutions influence electoral integrity. He recently published an article in Political Research Quarterly that examines how citizens’ experience with elections can influence their satisfaction with democracy, using panel data from Uganda. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sylvana Habdank-Kołaczkowska is the project director of Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual report on democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia. She also writes reports on Central Europe for Freedom of the Press. Previously, she was the managing editor of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a peer-reviewed quarterly. She received a master’s degree in Eastern European and Eurasian studies from Harvard University. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Paul Kubicek is a professor of political science and director of the International Studies Program at Oakland University. He is the author of numerous works on the European Union, democratization, and postcommunist and Turkish politics, which have appeared in journals including Comparative Politics, Political Studies, and Political Science Quarterly. His most recent book is Political Islam and Democracy in the Muslim World. He is the editor of Turkish Studies. He has taught in Ukraine, Turkey, and Austria, and was a Fulbright Scholar in Slovenia. He received a PhD in political science from the University of Michigan. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.  

Joshua Kurlantzick is a senior fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, he was a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he focused on Southeast Asian politics and economics and China’s relations with Southeast Asia. He is a longtime journalist whose articles have appeared in Time, the New Republic, the Atlantic Monthly, Foreign Affairs, and the New Yorker, among others. He is the author of the recently released book Democracy in Retreat: The Revolt of the Middle Class and the Worldwide Decline of Representative Government. He received a bachelor’s degree in political science from Haverford College. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Astrid Larson manages programs and special events at American Friends of the Louvre. She received a master’s degree in international media and culture from the New School University. She has served as an analyst for Western Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and the South Pacific for Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press report. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.  

William Lawrence is a visiting professor at George Washington University. Previously, he served as International Crisis Group’s North Africa director and as a State Department senior adviser for global engagement, serving the U.S. government in various capacities in Washington DC, and at some two dozen other U.S. missions across the Middle East and North Africa. He has taught at Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins University, and Tufts University; is co-author of After the Uprisings: Political Transition in Tunisia, Libya, and Yemen; and has published articles in Foreign Policy, the Guardian, Jeune Afrique, Figaro, Rue 89 (Nouvel Observateur), Al-Hayat, and Asharq al-Awsat, as well as with the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. He studied at Harvard University’s Center for Middle East Studies and holds a master’s degree and PhD from the Fletcher School at Tufts University. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Kelsey Lilley is assistant director for the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center, where she follows African political, security, and economic developments closely. Kelsey was formerly a Princeton in Africa Fellow with the International Rescue Committee. She holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from Davidson College. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Sophia Lin is an international human rights lawyer, and currently serves as legal and policy associate at the International Corporate Accountability Roundtable (ICAR). She graduated from American University Washington College of Law in 2013, and has served a senior staffer on the American University International Law Review. Before joining ICAR, Sophia served as a legal adviser at Sorini, Samet, and Associates, a consulting firm on trade, labor, and corporate social responsibility policy. Previously, she was an Asia research fellow at Freedom House. Sophia holds a bachelor’s degree from National Taiwan University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Joshua Lustig is editor of Current History, an international affairs journal based in Philadelphia. Previously, he was a senior editor at Facts On File World News Digest, covering Western Europe. He received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Columbia University. He served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Eleanor Marchant is a PhD student at the Annenberg School for Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in communications, development, and new technology in Africa. She is also a research associate at the Center for Global Communication Studies, where she works on African and transnational media research projects. Previously, she worked at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at Oxford University, the Media Development Investment Fund, and the Media Institute in Nairobi. She also served as assistant editor for Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press report. She received a master’s degree in international relations from New York University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Susana Moreira is an extractive-industries specialist at the World Bank. She received a PhD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, focusing on Chinese national oil companies’ investment strategies in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. She is involved in several other research projects, including Coping with Crisis in African States and Sino-U.S. Energy Triangles. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Bret Nelson is a program officer for Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press at Freedom House. He received master’s degrees in political science from Fordham University and in Middle East studies from the City University of New York Graduate Center. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Alysson Akiko Oakley is a PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University. Previously, she served as a senior adviser at the International Republican Institute and a program director at the U.S.-Indonesia Society. She has lived in Indonesia, with frequent postings to East Timor, for over 10 years. She received a master’s degree in international economics and Southeast Asian studies from SAIS and a bachelor’s degree in international relations from Brown University. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Robert Orttung is assistant director of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, president of the Resource Security Institute, and a visiting scholar at the Center for Security Studies at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. He is managing editor of Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization and a coeditor of the Russian Analytical Digest and the Caucasus Analytical Digest. He received a PhD in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles. He served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Shannon O’Toole is a master’s candidate in international relations at Central European University, in Budapest. Previously she worked as an editor at Facts On File World News Digest, where she covered Eastern Europe, Russia, and the Balkans. She has also contributed to several of Freedom House’s annual publications. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Nicole Phillips is assistant director of Haiti programs and adjunct professor at the University of San Francisco, as well as a law professor at the Université de la Foundation Dr. Aristide (UNIFA) in Port-au-Prince. She serves as a member of the board of directors of Human Rights Advocates, an NGO with consultative status to the UN, and has appeared before various UN bodies and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of California, San Diego, in political science with a concentration in international relations, and her JD from the University of San Francisco. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Arch Puddington is senior vice president for research at Freedom House and coeditor of Freedom in the World. He has written widely on American foreign policy, race relations, organized labor, and the history of the Cold War. He is the author of Broadcasting Freedom: The Cold War Triumph of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty and Lane Kirkland: Champion of American Labor. He received a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the University of Missouri, Columbia. He served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Laura Reed is a research analyst for Freedom House’s Freedom on the Net publication and covers internet freedom developments in Eurasia, Europe, and the West. She earned a master’s degree in human rights from Columbia University and a bachelor’s degree in international relations from Boston University. Reed served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom in the World

Alyssa Rickard has been working with Freedom House for over two years supporting programs and promoting human rights and good governance in Central and West Africa. She received her bachelor’s degree from Kalamazoo College in political science, international and area studies, and African studies. She has spent extended time in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly Senegal, studying and researching national politics, women’s rights, religion, and indigenous languages. She regularly blogs for Freedom House. She served as a sub-Saharan African analyst for Freedom in the World.

Andrew Rizzardi is a program coordinator with the Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University. He previously served as a researcher with Freedom House, working extensively on press freedom issues. He holds a master’s degree in international affairs from American University’s School of International Studies. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Mark Y. Rosenberg is the director for Africa and Research Management at Eurasia Group, focusing on the Southern Africa region. Previously, he worked as a researcher at Freedom House and assistant editor of Freedom in the World. His opinion articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Jerusalem Post, and South Africa’s Business Day. His research has been cited by publications including the Economist and the Financial Times. He received a master’s degree and a PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow. He served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Tyler Roylance is a staff editor at Freedom House and is involved in a number of its publications. Previously, he worked as a senior editor for Facts On File World News Digest. He received a master’s degree in history from New York University. He served as a Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Raza Ahmad Rumi is a Pakistani columnist, policy analyst, and journalist. He is consulting editor of the Friday Times, a senior fellow at the Jinnah Institute, and is most recently affiliated with the United States Institute of Peace. He served as a South Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Mark Schneider is a visiting assistant professor of political science at Swarthmore College. He received his PhD from Columbia University in 2015. His research and teaching interests include distributive politics, political parties, local governance, and state capacity. In particular, his work suggests that local democracy in India leads to the selection of politicians with pro-poor preferences over distribution, and that elections are much freer than existing work suggests. He served as a South Asia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jean Scrimgeour is a public affairs officer for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in Washington DC. She received her master’s degree from Kings College London and has worked in civil society for a number of years with a special focus on democratic governance, youth development, and civic engagement in South Africa. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Ben Self is the inaugural Takahashi Fellow in Japanese Studies at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center. Before joining the Center in September 2008, Self was at the Henry L. Stimson Center as a senior associate working on Japanese security policy. While at the Stimson Center, he directed projects on Japan-China relations, fostering security cooperation between the U.S.-Japan Alliance and the People’s Republic of China, Japan’s nuclear option, and confidence-building measures. Self has also carried out research and writing in areas such as nuclear nonproliferation and disarmament, ballistic missile defense, Taiwan’s security, Northeast Asian security dynamics, the domestic politics of Japanese defense policy, and Japan’s global security role. He served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Adrian Shahbaz is a research analyst for Freedom on the Net, where he covers the European Union and the Middle East and North Africa. Previously, he was a political affairs analyst and researcher at the UN, the European Parliament, and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. He received a master’s degree in international relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Debbie Sharnak is a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and teaches at New York University and St. Francis College. Her research focuses on transitional justice and human rights discourse in the Southern Cone. She has worked at several organizations including the International Center for Transitional Justice, Public Action Research, and the New Media Advocacy Project. Her research has been published by Foreign Policy, the North American Congress on Latin America (NACLA), Latin Correspondent, Diplomacy & Statecraft, and in several edited volumes. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Uruguay in 2014. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Valerie Sinden is the assistant program and conferences officer for the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA) at the National Endowment for Democracy. She has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and a master’s degree from the Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations at Seton Hall University. Before joining CIMA, Valerie had internships at Freedom House and the U.S. State Department in Dublin, Ireland. She also served as a senior editor for content for the Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Mira Sucharov is an associate professor of political science at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She is the author of The International Self: Psychoanalysis and the Search for Israeli-Palestinian Peace, and has published articles in International Studies Perspectives, the Journal of International Relations and Development, the International Journal, and the Journal of Political Science Education. She is a columnist at Haaretz and the Globe and Mail. She received a master’s degree in political science from the University of Toronto, and a PhD in government from Georgetown University. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Kavitha Surana is a multimedia journalist and recent graduate from NYU’s master’s program in Journalism and European and Mediterranean Studies. Her writing and video work have been published by many outlets including the Associated Press, Al Jazeera America, CNN, the New York Times, and PBS. A romance-language lover, she also translates Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, and French. She served as a Western Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Rachel Sweet is a PhD candidate in political science at Northwestern University. Her research focuses on the intersection of civilian and armed governance in settings of state fragility and war. She has conducted extensive field research on how state institutions shape the nature of rebel organization and has worked with the Rift Valley Institute to author reports on the production of public authority in conflict. Her research has been supported by a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Award, the Harry Frank Guggenheim Dissertation Fellowship, and an Andrew Mellon Fellowship for African Studies. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World. 

Natalie Sykes is a second-year law student at Columbia Law School. She earned her master’s degree in human rights at the London School of Economics, and holds a bachelor’s degree in foreign service from Georgetown University. A former intern at Freedom House, Natalie has written for both Freedom in the World and Freedom of the Press. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Farha Tahir is a senior program officer at the National Democratic Institute focusing on governance issues in Africa. She previously served as project manager at the International Interfaith Peace Corps, overseeing the Dakar Vaccination Summit, an effort with the government of Senegal to identify the challenges associated with vaccinating resistant and hard-to-reach Muslim communities throughout Africa. She also worked as a program coordinator and research associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, where she provided research regarding U.S. strategic priorities on the continent. She received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Silvana Toska is a PhD candidate in political science at Cornell University, focusing on the causes and spread of revolutions. She received master’s degrees in African studies from Oxford University, and in Arab studies from Georgetown University. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Jenny Town is the assistant director of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. Previously, she worked for the Human Rights in North Korea Project at Freedom House. She received a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, with a concentration in human rights. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Mai Truong is a senior program officer and Africa research analyst for Freedom on the Net, Freedom House’s annual assessment of internet and digital media freedom. Prior to joining Freedom House, she worked on projects related to international development, food security, and women’s rights issues in sub-Saharan Africa. She received a master’s degree in international relations from Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Noah Tucker has worked both in the nonprofit sector and as a researcher on Central Asian religion, human rights, security, and conflict. He served as a U.S. embassy policy specialist for Kyrgyzstan in 2011 and returned to Central Asia for fieldwork most recently in the summer of 2012. He received a master’s degree from Harvard University’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. He served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Vanessa Tucker is vice president for analysis at Freedom House. Previously, she was the project director of Countries at the Crossroads, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance. Prior to joining Freedom House, she worked at the Harvard University Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program, at the Kennedy School’s Program on Intrastate Conflict, and with the Carter Center’s Democracy Program. She received a master’s degree in international relations from Yale University. She served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Daria Vaisman is a New York–based writer and producer. Her first book, a narrative nonfiction account of U.S. foreign policy in the former Soviet Union, will be published in 2014. She is also codirector of a documentary film on diplomatic recognition and sovereignty, currently in production. Previously, she was an analyst at Transparency International, deputy director of the Eurasia Foundation in Tbilisi, Georgia, and a journalist covering the Caucasus and Central Asia. She received a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and is a PhD candidate in criminal justice at the City University of New York Graduate Center. She served as a Eurasia analyst for Freedom in the World.

Marija Vareikaite is a former Nations in Transit intern at Freedom House. She received a master’s degree in international human rights from the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Currently, she is a member at the UN Security Council team of the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Lithuania to the UN. She served as a Central and Eastern Europe analyst for Freedom in the World.

Christine Wade is an associate professor of political science and international studies at Washington College, where she is also the curator of the Louis L. Goldstein Program in Public Affairs. She has authored and coauthored numerous publications on Central American politics. She received a PhD in political science from Boston University. She served as an Americas analyst for Freedom in the World.

Greg White is a professor of government at Smith College. He is the author of Climate Change and Migration: Borders and Security in a Warming World and the forthcoming coedited volume North Africa: From Status Quo to (R)Evolution. He is also the recipient of a Mellon Foundation New Directions Fellowship, as well as Fulbright-IIE and Fulbright-Hays scholarships to Tunisia and Morocco, respectively. He received a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He served as a Middle East and North Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.

Anny Wong is an adjunct political scientist with the RAND Corporation and a research fellow with the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. She also serves on the board of the Japan-America Society of Dallas–Fort Worth and provides analyses on politics and economics in East and Southeast Asia for senior business executives. Her research covers science and technology policy, international development, military manpower, and U.S. relations with states in the Asia-Pacific region. She received a PhD in political science from the University of Hawaii, Manoa. She served as an Asia-Pacific analyst for Freedom in the World.

Lauren Young is a PhD candidate in political science at Columbia University and a Peace Scholar at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Her dissertation research focuses on how citizens assess the risk of repression and decide to submit to or resist the threat of violence by the state. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the International Peace Research Association. Her other academic projects examine inequality, electoral coercion, and the psychological effects of violence in Africa, Eastern Europe, and the Caribbean, and she has worked on policy-focused research and evaluation for UN agencies and international NGOs. She served as a sub-Saharan Africa analyst for Freedom in the World.