Freedom at Issue:

Insights on the global struggle for democracy

Ashley Greco-Stoner

Since early February, Venezuela has been rocked by nationwide protests and clashes with police that have killed more than a dozen people. Initially motivated by frustration with a collapsing economy and soaring crime rates, demonstrators are now struggling to defend their basic human rights in the face of the government’s aggressive response, which includes not only deadly police violence but a determined effort to choke off all independent sources of information about the crisis.

Regions: 
Africa Program Staff

Freedom House’s latest Freedom in the World report paints a bleak picture of democracy and human rights in Africa overall, with 88 percent of the population living in countries designated either Not Free or Partly Free. Nevertheless, there were a number of small victories on the continent during 2013, even in countries where the prevailing trend remains negative.

Cyrus Rassool


In many countries, political leaders take full advantage of social media platforms even as ordinary citizens face criminal prosecution for their own online activities.

Karen Marcus
Joseph Gates


February 14, 2014, marks the third anniversary of large public demonstrations calling for democratic reforms in Bahrain, which the monarchy met with excessive force and thousands of arrests.

Liridona Malota


Turkey has a history of violating internet freedom, and abuses of media freedom in general are rising sharply. But if President Abdullah Gül signs the restrictive internet bill adopted by the parliament last week, he will take the country into uncharted territory.

Regions: 
Robert Herman

The recent pressure on civil society and independent media in Kenya is not only a significant threat to democracy in a geopolitically important country, but also the predictable outcome of the international community’s failure to punish earlier, comparable state-driven repression in Ethiopia, another African nation that is viewed in Western capitals as a strategic partner.

 

David J. Kramer

This post originally appeared in the American Interest.
Democracy and freedom are in decline around the world. What should the United States do to reverse this trend? Better yet, what shouldn’t it do?

 

Michael Snyder


This week, Tunisia’s National Constituent Assembly approved a new constitution, taking a crucial step forward in the democratic transition that began after the overthrow of President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali in January 2011. The constitution has been widely hailed for its guarantees of fundamental human rights and civil liberties, including freedom of conscience, due process, and freedom of worship. But if Tunisian activists had not lobbied vigorously for the last-minute passage of amendments to safeguard media independence, the new constitution might have been received as a major defeat for freedom of the press.

Russell Raymond

As Egypt and Tunisia mark the third anniversary of their inspirational revolutions, the two countries find themselves on starkly different paths.

 

Chloe Schwenke

The current peace negotiations on Syria and South Sudan hold out the hope of mitigating and even resolving two of the world’s most destructive civil wars. But the talks are undermined by the glaring absence of women, who account for most of the millions of people displaced by the conflicts and will have an important role to play in any postconflict political process.

 

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